Skip to main content

Full text of "Report of the Director"

See other formats


School of Tropical Medicine 

UNDER THE AUSPICES OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

San Juan, Puerto Rico 



Report of the Director 

For the Year Ending June, 1941 



PUBLISHED BY THE 

University of Puerto Rico 

AND 

Columbia University 



^]^^^- (¿ /?" 






/ 



Q./// 



Printed in the United States of America 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Open Knowledge Commons 



http://www.archive.org/details/reportofdirector1941colu 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO 

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris) 

President of Columbia University 
Juan B. Soto, Ph.D., J.D Chancellor of the University of Puerto Rico 

George W. Bachman, Ph.D Director of the School of Tropical Medicine 

SPECIAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

José M. Gallardo, Ph.D., LL.D. . . . Commissioner of Education and Chairman 

of the Board 
Francisco López Domínguez, B.S. . Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce 

Jose F. Capó, M.D Member of the Board of Trustees of the 

University of Puerto Rico 

WiLLARD C. Rappleye, M.D., Sc.D Dean of the College of Physicians and 

Surgeons, Columbia University 
George W. Bachman, Ph.D Director of the School of Tropical Medicine 

SPECIAL COMMITTEE OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY FOR THE 
SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 

WiLLARD C. Rappleye, M.D., Sc.D Dean of the College of Physicians and 

Surgeons, Chairman 

James W. JoBLiNG, M.D Delafield Professor of Pathology in the College 

of Physicians and Surgeons 

Allen O. Whipple, M.D., Sc.D Valentine Mott Professor of Surgery in the 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

A. Raymond DocHEZ, M.D., Sc.D fohnE. Borne Professor of Medical and 

Surgical Research in the College of Physiciaiis and Surgeons 

Gary N. Calkins, Ph.D., Sc.D Professor Emeritus of Protozoology in 

Residence in Columbia University 

Earl Theron Engle, Ph.D Professor of Anatomy in the 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Magnus Ingstrup Gregersen, Ph.D Professor of Physiology in the 

College of Physicians and Surgeons 
DIRECTORS 

Robert A. Lambert, M.D. 1926-1928 

Earl B. McKinley, M.D.^ 1928-1931 

George W. Bachman, Ph.D. 193 i- 
''■ Deceased. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF THE SCHOOL OF 

TROPICAL MEDICINE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF 

PUERTO RICO, UNDER THE AUSPICES 

OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SPECIAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Gentlemen: 

We present in the following pages, as a record of the accomplish- 
ments of its administrative and research departments, the report of 
the School of Tropical Medicine for the fiscal year 1940-41. The 
exposition of the work of these departments is wholly factual, with 
httle commentary, so as to bring to those interested persons as com- 
plete and unbiased an account as possible of the results obtained 
therein. 

The year now reviewed brings to a satisfactory termination the 
architectural expansion program, planned early in the spring of 
1933. As has been stated several times in previous reports, the 
materialization of these additional units was only made possible 
through grants-in-aid received from Federal and insular agencies. 
It is worth while recording that the last two wings, containing 
ample space for a library, journal offices and living quarters, and a 
physiology department, respectively, together with facilities for ex- 
perimental animals in another building, were constructed with the 
combined assistance of the Puerto Rico Reconstruction Administra- 
tion and the Government of Puerto Rico. Another more recent 
grant has come from the Work Projects Administration, which ap- 
propriated $28,326 for the enlarging of the Experimental Animal 
House. The sponsor's fees, required in this case, were supplied by 
the Insular Government in the amount of $13,275. 

Sponsored by the American College of Hospital Administrators, 
the American Hospital Association, and local organizations, the 
first inter- American Institute for Hospital Administrators was held 



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

at the School December 1-14, 1940. This institute provided an 
original opportunity for a group of individuals, representing na- 
tional hospital organizations, to meet another group composed of 
representatives from Latin America for the discussion of problems 
of mutual interest that might lead to closer rapprochement between 
the hospitals of North and South America. 

Through the efforts of Mr. Félix Lámela the institute succeeded 
in registering ninety-two persons for the entire two-weeks' course, 
of whom thirty-four were physicians. Ninety-one workers in the 
hospital field, or its related services, registered for selected lectures 
and demonstrations, making a total of 183. This group represented 
a sizable cross section of hospital service personnel, principally from 
the Caribbean area, twenty-seven of whom were from outside 
Puerto Rico. 

The cornbined efforts of the School and of the Insular Health 
Department brought about, with the sanction of the Special Board 
of Trustees as of May 6, 1940, the opening of a Department of 
Public Health within the School, wherein an educational program 
comprising the various aspects of public health work, previously 
outlined and for which the sum of $65,000 had been set aside from 
funds apportioned under the National Security Act, was to be un- 
dertaken. Regular teaching commenced therein on February 17, 
1941, with some thirty-three students carefully selected from can- 
didates of high ability who had applied for admission. The work of 
this department will, for at least a number of years, be confined 
solely to the training of local personnel and to preparing men and 
women for administrative and field duties within the Insular 
Health Department. 

The Department of Public Health gives promise of developing 
into one of the strongest units of the School of Tropical Medicine 
which, with the support of the creative work of the research divi- 
sions of the institution, can look forward to great accomplishments 
in its field. The direct application of research projects, worked out 
in the School, can serve the Island in no better manner than through 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 7 

this public health program. However, in order to reach such an end, 
the interests of one department must not absorb the time and crea- 
tive energies of other groups. Teaching and research must follow 
hand in hand. 

Added impetus was given to the research work of the University 
Hospital when its professional staff, through legislative action, was 
last year invested with the authority to formulate rules of admission 
and of discharge, so that the Hospital could be set aside for investiga- 
tion in tropical diseases. It is gratifying to note in another part of this 
report the the far-reaching scope of the research that has been under- 
taken and completed during the year, in spite of the fact that lack of 
personnel and funds curtailed the program to some extent. It is 
hoped, however, that the recent increase in hospital appropriations 
for the coming fiscal year will redound in even greater success. 

The following persons are recalled as visitors to the School during 
the past year: Dr. Warren F. Draper, Assistant Surgeon General, 
Dr. E. C. Ernst, chief of the Pan American Sanitary Bureau, Dr. 
John D. Long, and Dr. John R. Murdock, all four of whom were 
from the United States Public Health Service; and Dr. Winfred 
Overholser, of St. Elizabeth's Hospital at Washington, D. C. In con- 
nection with the celebration of the Inter-American Institute for 
Hospital Administrators there came Dr. Malcolm T. MacEachern, 
associate director of the American College of Surgeons; Dr. A. C. 
Bachmeyer, chief of the University of Chicago Hospital clinics; Mr. 
James A. Hamilton, director of the University Hospital at New 
Haven, Connecticut; and Mr. Gerhard Hartman, executive secre- 
tary of the American College of Hospital Administrators. Drs. 
Walter Clarke and E. K. Keyes, of the American Social Hygiene 
Association ; Dr. A. Ashley Weech, Associate Professor of Pediatrics 
and Attending Pediatrician at the Babies' Hospital of the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons; and Dr. James A. DouU, of Western Re- 
serve University, participated in the work of the Department of 
Public Health. Dr. Harry S. Mustard, Director of the DeLamar 
Institute of Public Health; Dr. Philip E. Smith and Dr. Earl T. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



Engle, of the Department of Anatomy of the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons; Dr. H. L. Daiell, Director of Clinical Research of 
the Johnson Research Foundation at New Brunswick, New Jersey; 
Dr. George S. Stevenson, Medical Director of the National Com- 
mittee for Mental Hygiene; Dr. A. L, Briceño Rossi, of Venezuela; 
and Dr. Rulx León, of Haiti, were other distinguished visitors to 
the School. 

Personnel 

Several members of the Faculty and staff of the School left the 
institution for other positions. Among these, whose resignations 
we regret, are Dr. Joseph H. Axtmayer, who is now at the University 
of Puerto Rico; Mr. Jorge del Toro, formerly working in the Divi- 
sion of Biophysics and Solar Radiation Studies; and Messrs. Rafael 
Castejon and Ernesto González, both of whom were called for 
service in the army. 

The creation of the Department of Public Health added the fol- 
lowing members to the staff of the School: Dr. Albert V. Hardy, 
Associate Professor of Epidemiology, DeLamar Institute, assigned 
to the School of Tropical Medicine; Dr. O. Costa Mandry, Assistant 
Professor of Epidemiology; Mr. John M. Henderson, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Sanitary Science; Dr. Morton Kramer, Assistant Professor 
of Biostatistics; Miss Johanna J. Schwarte, Assistant Professor of 
Nursing Education; Dr. Myron E. Wegman, Assistant Professor 
of Child Hygiene; Dr. Guillermo Arbona, Associate in Public 
Health Practice ; Dr. Ernesto Quintero, Associate in Public Health 
Practice; Miss Josefina Acosta, Instructor in Parasitology; Miss 
Kathleen Logan, Instructor in Public Health Nursing; Miss Wini- 
fred M. Méndez, Instructor in Public Health Nursing; Dr. Elise 
Schlosser, Instructor in Epidemiology; Dr. José Chaves, Special 
Lecturer in Public Health Practice; and Dr. James Watt, Research 
Associate in Bacteriology. Another recent appointment was that of 
Dr. Marianne Goettsch, who comes to the School from the Depart- 
ment of Biochemistry of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, as 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 9 

The following members, who had been granted special leave of 
absence for advanced studies, recently returned from the North : Mr. 
José L. Janer, working in biostatistics at Johns Hopkins University; 
Mr. Luis M. González, completing his Master of Science in bacteri- 
ology at the University of Pennsylvania; Mr. Gilberto Rivera Her- 
nández, at the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science; and 
Miss Leonor González, studying at the University of Chicago for 
work as medical record Hbrarian. Mr. José Oliver González returned 
during the summer to the University of Chicago to complete the 
final requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. 

Mrs. Constance M. Locke, for many years English copy-editor of 
The Puerto Rico ]ournal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, 
is spending several months at Columbia University Press, in connec- 
tion with her work of editing the ]ournal. 

A satisfactory arrangement which was worked out with the au- 
thorities of the National Youth Administration and the Students' 
Vocational Guidance Bureau has supplied several additional 
"dieners" to the laboratories of the School. To date six youths from 
the N YA and two from the Vocational Guidance Bureau are work- 
ing in the institution. This arrangement was later extended to in- 
clude the University Hospital where fourteen nurses' aids have been 
added to the present graduate nursing staff. 

An unexpected honor, received with special satisfaction in the 
School, was Dr. Pablo Morales Otero's appointment as Consultant 
on Epidemiological Diseases to the Secretary of War of the United 
States. It was also gratifying to learn of Dr. Arturo L. Carrion's 
membership in the Mycological Society of America. 

Miss Cecilia Benitez' untimely death was deeply felt by her com- 
panions, all of whom recognized her brilliant career in bacteriology. 

Lectures and Clinics 

It is over fourteen years since the Thursday evening lectures were 
instituted as a part of the activities of the School of Tropical Medi- 
cine and, during this time, the diversity of subjects presented has 
never failed to bring together for interesting discussion distin- 



10 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



guished members of the medical profession, bodi of the Island and 
from abroad. These conferences have also added materially to the 
educational program of the institution. The following is the sched- 
ule circulated at the commencement of the regular academic year in 
November last: 



1940 
November 7 Lecture: Experimental Studies on Nodular Worm Diseases 
in Cattle. Dr. John S. Andrews. 

November 14 Clinic: Clinical Roentgenology. A System of Cardiac Meas- 
urements. Dr. p. Ramos Casellas. 

November 28 Lecture: The Gonodotropic Hormones. Dr. Philip E. Smith, 
College o£ Physicians and Surgeons. 

December 5 Lecture: Hospital Contributions to Professional Education. 
Dr. a. C. Bachmeyer, University of Chicago. 

December 19 Lecture: Enzymatic Anthelmintics of Vegetable Origin. Dr. 

Conrado F. Asenjo. 
1941 
January 9 Lecture: A Study of Hemolytic Streptococci as Found in 

Puerto Rico. Dr. A. Pomales Lebrón, 

January 16 Lecture: Deforming Footwear. Major Lester M. Dyke, 
U. S, A. Medical Corps. 

January 23 Lecture: Some Activities in Relation to Insect-borne Diseases. 
Dr. T. H. D. Griffitts, U. S. Public Health Service. 

January 30 Lecture: The Problem of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Puerto 
Rico in the Event of Mobilization. Lieutenant J. R. Vivas, 
U. S. A. Medical Corps. 

February 13 Lecture: The Pathology of Schistosomiasis mansoni in Puerto 
Rico. Dr. Enrique Koppisch. 

February 20 CUnic: Staff of the Presbyterian Hospital. 

February 27 Lecture: The Management of the Bleeding Gastric Ulcer. 
Dr. Basilio DÁvila. 

March 6 Lecture: Surgical Accidents in Biliary Surgery, with Report 

of a Case of Broncho-biliary Fistula. Dr. Ralph M, Mugrage. 

March 13 Lecture: The Genesis of Edema. Dr. A. Ashley Weech, 
College of Physicians and Surgeons. 




Colonnade Leading to Library 



(Photo by H. Hull) 



March 


20 


March 


27 


April 


3 


April 


10 


April 


17 


April 


24 


May 


I 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE II 

Clinic: Staff of the University Hospital, 

27 Lecture: The Function of the District Hospitals in Relation 
to Community Needs, Dr. R. H. Seneriz, 

Lecture: The Relationship of Convulsions and Hyperthermia 
in Children. Dr. Myron E. Wegman. 

Lecture: Balantidiasis Coli. Preliminary Report of Three 
Cases under Study. Dr. A, Díaz Atiles, 

Lecture: Behind the Art of Medical Practice. Dr. George S. 
Stevenson, National Committee for Mental Hygiene. 

Clinico-pathological Conference: Dr. Enrique Koppisch. 

Clinic: Thyroid Surgery in Puerto Rico. Presentation of 
Cases. Dr. J. Noya Benítez. 

May 2 Lecture: Interesting Aspects of the History of Tuberculosis. 

Dr. James A. Doull, Western Reserve University. 

May 8 Clinico-pathological Conference: Dr. Enrique Koppisch. 

May 15 Lecture: Bacillary Dysentery. Dr. James Watt, United States 

Public Health Service. 

May 22 Lecture: Urological Aspects of Hypertension, Dr. E. García 

Cabrera. 

May 29 Clinico-pathological Conference: Dr. Enrique. Koppisch. 

We here wish to record our appreciation to the Program Commit- 
tee of the School and to those speakers who made the above program 
a success. 

The Library 

The outstanding event in library activities was the change of 
locale, a change which took place with the least possible confusion 
at the close of the last calendar year. The new library is now the 
answer to the urgent need for space which had been facing this 
department of the institution for many years. Modern Spanish 
Renaissance, the building is in keeping with the architectural style 
of both the School and the Hospital, with a reading room that com- 
fortably seats fifty persons and is constructed so as to insure the best 



12 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

light and ventilation. The building also contains an ample audito- 
rium, offices for the staíí of the Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health 
and Tropical Medicine, and comfortable living quarters for visiting 
professors and investigators coming to the School. 

While the facilities of the library are primarily available to the 
Faculty and staff of the School, they are also offered without undue 
formalities to the medical profession of the Island at large, and to 
that part of the public which is interested in the progress of science. 
The library is now kept open three evenings a week and on Saturday 
afternoons, in addition to the daily sessions, and will continue as a 
center for cementing good will and understanding between the 
growing staff of the School and visitors. The library is also giving 
service to the medical groups of the United States army and navy 
now stationed in Puerto Rico. 

With the establishment of the Department of Public Health in 
the School, funds were set aside from its departmental appropriation 
to obtain additional books and journals in subjects allied to this field. 
Some 342 reference books have been added to date to the files of the 
library. At the present time the latter contains 6,434, of which 3,982 
are bound journals. Two hundred and ninety-seven periodicals are 
now received. Of these, ninety are obtained by purchase, 146 by ex- 
change, and sixty-one are free. Forty-four of the total come from 
Latin American countries. However, conditions abroad have had a 
somewhat confusing effect upon the receipt of these journals. Some 
of those formerly received have not been resumed, while others are 
being held up for fear of loss in transit. The above figures, therefore, 
are given on the basis of the journals coming prior to the disruption 
of service by present conditions. 

Through friends and the good offices of the Medical Library 
Association, the School has received 352 volumes and 2,903 issues. 
The continued generous assistance of Mr. Thomas P. Fleming, of 
Columbia University, and the interested cooperation of Drs. Wil- 
liam A. Hoffman, Francisco Hernández Morales, Ramón Ruiz 
Nazario, Pablo Morales Otero, A, T. Cooper, and Donald H. Cook, 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE I3 

of the staii of the School, provide the Hbrary with new material 
which is always most acceptable. A recent gift was in the form of 
several subscriptions that came, through the interest of Dr. H. L. 
Daiell, Director of Clinical Research, from the Johnson Research 
Foundation, at New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

In addition to keeping up with the examining, checking, and 
arrangement of all material acquired by gift or exchange, a surplus 
number of copies have been listed and made ready for exchange; the 
collection of reprints has at last been sorted and a start made, 
toward the same end, in the stack of dissertations from foreign uni- 
versities and the miscellaneous reports, which were formerly impos- 
sible to handle through lack of space. 

The library has served as training ground for a young girl from 
the Insular Health Department, Miss C. Diaz Bonnet, who was an- 
ticipating a position in that office of the Government and whose 
work was supervised, in spite of her many duties, by the librarian 
herself. 

The Journal 

As in many other fields, the European war has also affected greatly 
the distribution of the Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and 
Tropical Medicine, since conditions abroad have cut off almost all 
foreign subscriptions. At present only a few of these are being held 
for the duration. However, increasing interest in our cultural rela- 
tions with Latin American countries has made the bilingual charac- 
ter of the Journal more of a vital link between our respective nations. 
An encouraging aspect is the fact that the larger proportion of ex- 
changes during the year has been with Latin America. 

In the pages of the Journal and those of other periodicals, thirty- 
seven articles have appeared under the names of members of the 
School; fifteen are in press. 

The editorial staff of the Journal is now occupying new offices on 
the ground floor of the library building, within easy access to the 
library itself and its many reference files. 



14 columbia university 

Cooperative Agencies and Their Problems 

Still foremost among the School's cooperative enterprises is the 
study on the nutritive value of Island forage crops, carried on by the 
Department of Chemistry and financed, in part, for the past four 
years with funds from appropriations under the Bankhead Jones 
Act disbursed through the Agricultural Experiment Station. The 
findings from the study have appeared in yearly reports and have 
contributed -a fund of knowledge on the feeding and care of domes- 
tic farm animals. The Station has also continued its cooperation with 
the Division of Animal Parasitology, which has its laboratory in the 
School and out of which much information of value has already 
come. 

The Insular Department of Agriculture and Commerce is now 
jointly financing with the School two more problems, under investi- 
gation in the Department of Chemistry: the study of the chemical 
composition and nutritive value, respectively, of some native fatty 
oils. 

The University of Puerto Rico continues its cooperation in the 
work of the Division of Biophysics and Solar Radiation Studies. 
Collaboration between the Insular Health Department and the 
School remains one of the most promising in the field of public 
health education. 

This year brings to a close the financial grant, offered by tlie John 
and Mary R. Markle Foundation, for the maintenance of the San- 
tiago Primate Colonies. 

Projects under grants of the Johnson Research Foundation are 
under way. 

With the added facilities that the institution has now at its dis- 
posal in the new building units, its Faculty and staff are always will- 
ing to cooperate with agencies either in or outside the Island. The 
School believes, however, that much of the foundation for the work 
which the army and navy now contemplate here has already been 
laid in the institution's deliberate and planned attack on tropical 
diseases during the past fifteen years. 



school of tropical medicine i5 

Departments of the School 

Bacteriology. Dr. Pablo Morales Otero, Head 

A shortage of personnel, absent on study leave and army service, 
has handicapped to a considerable extent the work of this depart- 
ment. Notwithstanding, an increasing amount of routine for the 
University Hospital, insular agencies, and mihtary units on the 
Island has gone out of its laboratory during the year under review. 
Research projects and the new teaching schedule have likewise been 
carried forward with a diminished staff. 

During this time the Department completed its study on the he- 
molytic streptococci isolated from the throat of normal monkeys, 
the biological characteristics of which organism demonstrated that 
they were of human origin. This incidence in hemolytic streptococci 
proved to be higher than that for normal individuals dwelling in 
Puerto Rico, hence it is of interest to note that group A hemolytic 
streptococci were not found in the throat of these monkeys after 
they had been here for more than a year. These findings are in keep- 
ing with the results from a previous study of persons living in Puerto 
Rico, showing that the incidence of group A strain of beta-hemolytic 
streptococci, isolated from normal throats and from throats of a 
general population group, was lower than that of strains cultured 
from similar sources in temperate climates. The last findings may 
help to explain the low incidence of certain streptococci conditions 
in Puerto Rico. 

The work on Brucella continues. All routine agglutination tests 
for the Department of Agriculture, totaling 1,076 during this period, 
are being done in the laboratory of this department. Of these tests, 
III were reactors; 856, nonreactions ; and 109, suspects. 

The study of the effects of sulfanilamide and sulfamethylthiazol 
on experimental Brucella infection in mice was completed. Sulfa- 
nilamide and sulfamethylthiazol, administered by mouth for five 
consecutive days, markedly extended the survival period of mice 
infected intraperitoneally with Brucella melitensis, the latter drug 
proving more effective than sulfanilamide. Under the conditions 



l6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

described above, diese drugs inhibited the infection but did not kill 
the organism in the tissues of the host. In some instances the number 
of colonies was small, indicating marked inhibition of the prolifera- 
tion of the organism in the tissues. Such partial inhibiton, as a result 
of the treatment, suggests a tendency toward the establishment of a 
chronic infection, in which case these drugs may be useful in study- 
ing such chronic conditions in the experimental animal. 

The effect of azosulfamide and sulfanilamide on experimental 
welchii infection was also studied. Observations showed that neither 
of these drugs altered phagocytosis. Sulfanilamide, apparently, had 
a decided bacteriostatic effect in vivo, as well as in vitro, against 
Clostridium welchii, but Neoprontosil did not show any bacterio- 
static effect in vitro against cultures of the same organism. Intra- 
muscular injections of Neoprontosil did not protect mice from 
minimal lethal doses of CI. welchii, though in a few instances in 
which Neoprontosil was given orally, a slight protection was ob- 
served. However, sulfanilamide protected mice from minimal doses, 
when used either orally or parenterally, and was found to be superior 
to Neoprontosil in the treatment of experimental welchii infection 
in mice. 

With Dr. Cecil A. Krakower, of the Department of Pathology, a 
study was completed on the effect of alpha-tocopherol on the muscu- 
lar lesions of vitamin A-deficient rats, demonstrating that these 
lesions are due to a deficiency in vitamin E and are not related to the 
deficiency in vitamin A. 

Another of Dr. Krakower's studies is that on the effect of varying 
dosages of viosterol on the muscular lesions produced by a deficiency 
in vitamin E in rats, on both adequate and inadequate vitamin A 
diets. The object of this investigation is to find out what factors 
underlie the calcification of these lesions. Unfortunately, although 
the experiment has not been completed, there has been very heavy 
mortality among the experimental animals, a condition which will 
interfere with the ultimate conclusions of the study. 

In connection with experimental leprosy, Dr. Krakower has made 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE V] 

the following observations: (i) No diííerences were so far observed 
in infected rats kept on a high cholesterol diet. (2) Investigation of 
the effect of lepra-codliver oil emulsion on the development of ex- 
perimental leproma showed that this emulsion apparently enhances 
the growth of the leproma. (3) Transmission experiments with 
mouse leprosy proved that hamsters appear to be as susceptible to 
this strain of lepra organism as to that of rat leprosy. (4) Feeding 
sulfanilamide to rats in their diet prevented leprous lesions from 
developing. The doses of chaulmestrol used had little or no effect on 
them, and trypan blue apparently enhanced their growth. The 
effects of diphtheria toxoid on experimental leprosy are also being 
investigated. 

Experimental schistosomiasis in the guinea pig, in collaboration 
with Dr. William A. Hoffman, of the Department of Medical Zo- 
ology, has been the object of special observations; also a study on the 
effects of estradiol propionate in female rhesus monkeys, conducted 
under the supervision of Dr. Earl T. Engle, of the Department of 
Anatomy of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia 
University. 

A course in bacteriology, designed to provide an elementary 
knowledge of the common varieties of bacterial etiological agents, 
the mechanism of resistance, and the practical procedure for the 
prevention of human infections, was given to ten graduate nurses ; 
also a second course, to twenty-five students, in systematic bacteriol- 
ogy and immunology, with special emphasis on its application to 
public health and epidemiology. 

During the year the facilities of the laboratory were extended to 
Mrs. S. D. Grifiitts, working on the dysentery group of organisms, 
and to Miss Thelma De Capito, for work in bacillary dysentery, 
under Dr. James Watt, Research Associate of the Department. 

The Department acknowledges a generous grant of $4,000, re- 
ceived from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, for the pur- 
chase of much needed equipment essential to the continuation of its 
research studies. 



l8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Chemistry. Dr. Donald H. Cook, Head 

In cooperation with the Agricultural Experiment Station, the 
work on forage crops continued on schedule, with twelve digestion 
trials of six animals each, using Merker grass, fertilized and un- 
fertilized, with two months' interval between cutting. Only grass of 
the second cutting was furnished. A digestion trial, using hibiscus 
as feed, was also made. Analyses and indexes of the samples collected 
are now being tabulated. In all, 2,415 analyses were completed on 
Merker grass, elephant grass, Guatemala grass, guinea grass, and 
"Gramalote" grass, with one week between, samples starting with 
first cutting on a dry and wet basis. This work, as part of the nutri- 
tional studies conducted by the Department, has been under way for 
the past four years, subsidized by a grant from Bankhead-Jones 
funds, and is now considered terminated, in so far as research therein 
is concerned. 

In addition, analyses of culture solution, furnished by members 
of the Agricultural Experiment Station, were performed, together 
with tests for the determination of calcium, magnesium, potassium, 
phosphorus, manganese, iron, and nitrogen in die plants sent in. 
Fifteen samples of legumes resulted in 248 determinations ; 869 from 
sargo plants grown on different soils and with various fertilizers. 
Analyses of nutritionally available iron in thirty common food 
plants of the Island were completed, and others are being continued 
as samples become handy. 

Work on a study of the development of rancidity in coconut 
cream (leche de coco) is being continued. There is evidence that 
rolled oat extract, added to the coconut cream, delays the develop- 
ment of rancidity. A late report in the literature that gum guiacum 
has been found to have an anti-oxident property, delaying the devel- 
opment of rancidity, is being investigated. 

After returning from the University of Wisconsin in the summer 
of 1940, Dr. Conrado F. Asenjo has been engaged in organizing his 
laboratory for research in phytochemistry and has already under- 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE I9 

taken the following projects, as part of the nutritional work of the 
Department: 

1. In cooperation with the Department of Agriculture, a study of 
the chemical composition of some native fatty oils. Several constants 
of pressed avocado oil and pressed grapefruit-seed oil have been com- 
pleted, work continuing on the different saturated acids in the oils. 

2. In collaboration with the Department of Agriculture and the 
Department of Chemistry of the University of Puerto Rico, a study 
of the nutritive value of native fatty oils — avocado and grapefruit 
seed. 

3. In cooperation with the Agricultural Experiment Station, a 
study of the papain content of the different parts of the papaya plant 
during its whole life cycle. By using the milk-clotting technique of 
Dr. Balls and the standard f ormol titration, with gelatin as substrate. 
Dr. Asenjo has been working on the proteolytic enzyme (papain) 
of the papaya plant, determining when and where the enzyme is 
first elaborated. Results so far show that papain appears first in the 
leaves, then in the stem, and lastly, in the roots. The seed does not 
contain any measurable amount of enzyme. The plants utilized as 
yet are too immature to have produced fruit. 

4. Dr. Asenjo has been studying the preparation of the proteolytic 
enzyme of pineapples (bromelin), and has also been determining 
the stage at which the maximum amount appears in the juice. It has 
been found that the green fruit contains the largest amount of 
enzyme, the content of bromeHn decreasing as the fruit ripens. 
Through the courtesy of the Puerto Rico Fruit Exchange, a steady 
supply of green pineapples has been received. The crude bromelin 
is now being prepared from this fruit, yielding from 0.5 to i.o gram 
of enzyme per liter of juice. Both bromelin and papain have a wide 
range of medicinal and industrial uses. 

The Department made miscellaneous tests for vitamin C determi- 
nation at the requests of the Presbyterian and University Hospitals. 
The results indicated that, though scurvy may not be a recognized 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

entity here, patients have been found excreting no C in the urine and 
requiring considerable intake to produce the first trace of this vita- 
min. In addition, one hemoglobin for carbon monoxide test was 
conducted, although the presence of carbon monoxide was not con- 
firmed. A bladder stone submitted by the Department of Pathology 
for identification proved to be a calcium stone rather than cho- 
lesterol, though the latter was present in small amounts. 

The Department also made determinations of a miscellaneous 
nature for the naval units on the Island and assisted in numerous 
ways with the various government agencies and departments of the 
School and Hospital. 

Twenty-two students from the Public Health Department reg- 
istered for a class in the chemistry of food and nutrition, given by the 
staff of the Department. 

During the year the Department had the good fortune of being 
the recipient of a grant-in-aid amounting to S300, donated by the 
Johnson Research Foundation, of New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

Dermatology. Dr. Arturo L. Carrion, Head 

The study of the dermatomycoses in Puerto Rico is progressing. 
Observations on ringworm of the scalp, extended over a period of 
nine years, now include a total of twenty-six cases. A general revision 
of the clinical histories, together with a comparative study of the 
fungi isolated in these cases, is under way, and it is hoped that a 
report on the final results, which will include valuable information 
concerning the clinical behavior of this dermatomycosis in Puerto 
Rico, as well as a complete study of the mycologic aspects of the 
disease, can be made ready by next year. 

The general survey on fungus diseases in Puerto Rico has been 
continued during the year. Special attention is being devoted to pul- 
monary infections of obscure etiology in order to determine: {a) 
how many of these infections are due to fungi; {b) what mycotic 
species are of etiologic importance; and {c) what clinical features 
may be of importance in the differential diagnosis of the pulmonary 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 21 

mycoses. This study has been the subject of much discussion with 
several leading specialists in diseases of the lung who have proved 
their interest and cooperation by forwarding to the Department 
clinical material from ten patients suffering from this type of pul- 
monary infections, in two of which cases study has disclosed fungi 
suspicious of being important etiologically. 

Investigation on chromoblastomycosis has also continued. A new 
case was discovered and studied early this year, its etiologic fungus 
being classed as Fonsecaea Pedrosoi, var. communis. Two new 
fungus strains, isolated from cases occurring in Venezuela, were 
sent for classification by Dr. J. A. O'Daly, of Caracas. One of the 
fungi was classed as Fonsecaea Pedrosoi, var. communis, while the 
other was a typical Hormodendrum species. 

The Department has recently initiated a preliminary study on the 
immunology of fungus infections, which includes cutaneous reac- 
tions and agglutination and complement fixation tests. In connec- 
tion therewith it is preparing a set of antigens from cultures 
developed in the same liquid medium used for the preparation of 
tuberculin, a method which has been proved successful by several 
investigators in California, working with Coccidioides immitis. The 
antigen prepared by the California workers, namely, coccidioidin, 
appears to be highly specific and is claimed to be useful, not only for 
cutaneous, but also for precipitin and complement fixation reactions. 
This material is now being injected intradermally in patients suffer- 
ing from other fungus infections, in order to test the specificity of 
the antigen. So far only seventeen patients have been tested, hence 
no conclusions may yet be drawn. 

Agglutination tests on patients suffering from infections with 
Monilia albicans have been performed in twenty-eight instances. 
Observations thereon are not conclusive, since the Department has 
been endeavoring all along to improve its technique. With respect 
to the complement fixation tests, considerable work is being at- 
tempted in order to adapt this test to fungus antigens, as it is believed 
that the application of these various immunologic tests to the my- 



22 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

cotic infections will be fundamentally important in the differential 
diagnosis of many of the mycoses and may contribute, in addition, 
to a better understanding of the botanical relationships existing 
among many pathogenic fungi. 

The routine specimens sent to the laboratory of the Department 
for examination have increased tremendously in number, totaling 
480 for the year under review, of which 122 were positives on direct 
examination and seventy-nine positives in culture. The following 
fungi were isolated from this material : 

1. Monilia albicans: four strains from sputum 

2. Monilia strains, unclassified: two from tongue; two from vagina; four 
from feces; seven from nails; four from toes; twenty from sputum 

3. Yeastlike fungi, unclassified: two from sputum; two from toes; one from 
feces 

4. Trichophyton rubrum: two from onychomycosis; six from toes; five from 
body 

5. Trichophyton mentagrophytes: seven from toe nails; seven from toes; 
one from sole of foot 

6. Epidermophyton floccosum: one from toes 

7. Aspergillus niger: one from external auditory canal 

During the year, an opportunity to see and to learn from the ac- 
complishments of other workers in dermatology and allied fields 
came to the head of the Department through an extended trip to 
several medical centers of the United States. Much interesting in- 
formation was obtained as well as valuable material for teaching. 

In the period between July 8 and July 11, 1940, the Department 
offered five lectures and laboratory demonstrations on medical 
mycology to a group of medical students from the North. Further- 
more, it has actively cooperated with the Department of Clinical 
Medicine in certain investigations related to recurrent lymphangitis 
and bronchomoniliasis. 

Medical Zoology, Dr. William A. Hoffman, Head 

During the summer and autumn of 1940 the head of this depart- 
ment collected specimens of Culicoides and related forms wherever 
possible in the Rocky Mountain region. Here a species of Culicoides 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 23 

hieroglyphictis, described first from Arizona and since found in 
neighboring states, really represents a complex of species. The 
females are identical in all discernible morphological details, though 
the males can be distinguished on gentitalial differences. At least 
three new forms have been recognized on this basis. The factor of 
isolation, always present in extensive mountain ranges, probably 
plays an important part in such formation of species but if, in the 
future, Culicoides are found to function as transmitters of animal 
diseases or parasites in the West, this study will have a bearing upon 
the subject. 

The month of August was devoted to a more intense study of 
Culicoides at the Rocky Mountain Laboratory. In addition to find- 
ing one representative of the hiero glyphicus group and a new species 
of Culicoides in another group, additional information was gained 
concerning the distribution of known forms. Furthermore, oppor- 
tunity was given to become acquainted with the staff of that labora- 
tory, all of whom were very hospitable, and to gain some idea of its 
multifarious activities. 

During the journey eastward Dr. Hoffman's brief stay at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota made it possible for him to identify Culicoides 
material in the collection of that institution, and to obtain new 
distributional records. While Dr. Hoffman was at the Johns Hop- 
kins School of Hygiene he devoted some time to the material col- 
lected in the West and to the identification of Culicoides for the 
National Museum from material in that group accumulated during 
the past two years. Collections have recently arrived at the School for 
identification from the state institutions of Utah and Michigan. 

The Division of Animal Parasitology of the Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station, working in cooperation with the School, has been 
chiefly concerned with the completion of experimental studies on 
nodular oesophagostomiasis in cattle, and with the preparation of 
manuscripts setting forth the results of these investigations. 

The parasite collection has been increased by 120 specimens since 
the previous report, thus making a total of 344 specimens. However, 



24 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

as far as determined, no species new to the collection have been 
added during the year. 

Bloat colic in horses was studied again this year, but the cause of 
the disease in this instance was not ascertained. Work on a quantita- 
tive method for the determination of blood in the feces of sheep was 
completed. 

Experimental work on the use of the anthelmintic, phenothizaine, 
for the control of cattle parasites in Puerto Rico has been started. 
The purpose of this experiment is to ascertain the best method of 
administering the chemical under local conditions and to study the 
effect of the drug on the development of pasture infections and on 
calves undergoing daily treatment. 

Dr. Hildrus Poindexter, of Howard University Medical School, 
devoted the past summer to a study of Endamoeba histolytica in the 
monkey colony on Santiago Island. 

Mr. Rafael Cordova, a member of the Department of Biology of 
the University of Puerto Rico, who has been coming to the labora- 
tory to familiarize himself with parasites in connection with his 
teaching duties at the University, is now devoting his spare time to 
biological studies of the local trematodes. One of his most interesting 
finds was the discovery of a fork-tailed cercaria (family Strigeidae) 
in Australorbis glabratus, not heretofore found; in fact, the form in 
question seems to bear no close relationship to any strigeids whose 
illustrations are locally available. Mr. Cordova has also been able to 
induce the formation of large cysts in local fish (probably Poecilia 
mfipara), the adult possibly occurring in the intestine of a semi- 
aquatic bird. 

Mrs. Ana M. Diaz Collazo within recent months has spent con- 
siderable time in laboratory biological studies on Australorbis gla- 
bratus, the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni. Investigations 
of this nature have been rare and offer great promise. 

During the last few months of the school year the following per- 
sons have enjoyed privileges in the Department: Dr. Luis Mazzotti, 
traveling on a fellowship of the Mexican Government; Dr. Eliza- 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 25 

beth Gambrell, of Emory University, Georgia; Dr. Harry Most, of 
New York University School of Medicine; and Dr. Saul Jarcho, 
of the Department of Pathology of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons of Columbia University. 

Pathology. Dr. Enrique Koppisch, Head 

The training in general pathology of outside personnel which, to 
date, comprises a number of physicians entering the service of the 
district hospitals of the Island, as well as their laboratory assistants, 
has taken considerable time from the regular work of the Depart- 
ment. Notwithstanding, it has been found vitally important to as- 
sume such duties, since such an activity may eventually release the 
personnel of the Department from much of the routine work now 
carried by them. It has, therefore, been gratifying to note than an 
increasing amount of the services, once required by many of the 
local organizations, is now being handled more and more by the 
staff of these various hospitals. 

The forty-four autopsies performed in the past year have, for the 
most part, come from four hospitals, thus gradually limiting autopsy 
work to the University and Presbyterian Hospitals. This is in ac- 
cordance with the original plans of the institution, when it was 
decided that autopsy service would be given only in special cases 
and when assistance of a technical nature would be required. On the 
other hand, miscellaneous pathology, such as surgical and experi- 
mental specimens and partial autopsies, has taken a marked rise. 
A comparison with the previous year shows a total increase in this 
material from 3,001 to 3,468, or 12.2 percent over the corresponding 
period for last year. The increase in experimental entries was from 
429 to 521 (21.4 percent), and in surgical specimens, from 2,572 to 
2,947 (i4-5 percent). Included with these surgicals are 141 autopsies. 
These figures make it easy to understand how excessive is the load 
of routine work carried by the Department. Technically, there has 
been no difficulty in keeping up with the volume of work, because 
of the additional personnel who are being trained. On the other 



20 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

hand, the professional staff has not increased since the Department 
was estabUshed fifteen years ago, while routine and research activi- 
ties have grown beyond its control and capacity to handle alone. 

Research in the Department has been chiefly on the following 
problems : 

1. Study of a case of schistosomal miliary pseudotuberculosis of 
the lungs, in whose death treatment with Fouadin may have played 
a part. 

2. Study on the mode of extrusion of schistosome ova into the 
tissues. 

3. Study of Weil's disease on the following lines: (a) the carrier 
rate among wild rats and gray mice; (b) laboratory diagnosis of 
suspected cases; (c) study of the strains isolated; and (d) epidemiol- 
ogy. So far, three human cases have been reported in Puerto Rico 
since June, 1940; from two, leptospirae pathogenic for guinea pigs 
were isolated; in the third case, they were nonpathogenic. Lepto- 
spirae were also isolated from two wild rats and two gray mice, but 
none have proved pathogenic for the guinea pig. The number of 
human cases and of wild rats and mice, so far studied, has been too 
limited to come to definite conclusions on the carrier rate among the 
latter, nor on the predominant characteristics of the strains isolated. 
It has likewise not been possible to define with precision the circum- 
stances under which the infection is contracted in Puerto Rico. 

4. Studies on herpes virus: analysis of spontaneous variation in 
the characters of Flexner's H.P. strain, appearing in the course of 
studies on herpetic myelitis in the rabbit. 

5. Study of three cases of suspected typhus utilized in attempts to 
transmit the causative agent to laboratory animals, without success. 
In two cases of pemphigus it was not possible to isolate a virus; three 
strains of herpes simplex were isolated from human cases. 

The following persons received training as technicians in pathol- 
ogy during all, or part of, the period covered by this report : Mr. Luis 
Vélez and Mr. Jaime Dávila, now in the Fajardo and Bayamon dis- 
trict hospitals, respectively, and Mrs. Félix M. Reyes. Dr. Francisco 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 27 

Mejías Hernández, who also spent some time in this department, is 
in charge of the laboratory of pathology of the Fajardo District 
Hospital. Dr. Biagio Cino, of Santo Domingo, spent some time 
studying general padiology. 

Of those persons enjoying the facilities of the Department, Dr. 
Manuel de la Püa continues to utilize its autopsy material for studif' 
on the normal weight of the heart of Puerto Ricans, and on cardio- 
vascular diseases as a cause of death in Puerto Rico. Dr. Ernst Kohl- 
schütter, of Germany, continues his work as voluntary assistant, 
devoting his time exclusively to research. 

A grant received from the Johnson Research Foundation, of New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, in the amount of $700, will make possible 
the commencement of a new study, with Dr. Charis Gould, of the 
Presbyterian Hospital, on the possible action of synthetic estrogens 
on inhibition of human ovulation. 

Public Health. Dr. Albert V. Hardy, Head 

This department began to function ofi&cially as of the beginning 
of the academic year 1940—41, with its major immediate objective 
the preparation for training students in the different fields of public 
health. The first six months were therefore taken up with organiz- 
ing, gathering of staff, obtaining teaching materials, and developing 
teaching laboratories. In space released for the purpose, two labora- 
tories satisfactory for the teaching of bacteriology, parasitology, or 
chemistry were constructed, and classrooms for biostatistics and 
drafting completed, all sufficiently adequate to accommodate classes 
as large as may be expected. Room alterations were financed with 
funds from the W PA and the Insular Department of the Interior. 

Mr. John M. Henderson arrived in November to take charge of 
the training in public health engineering; Miss Johanna J. Schwarte, 
in January, to fill the senior position in public health nursing; and 
Dr. Myron E. Wegman, in February, to occupy the post in maternal 
and child hygiene. Dr. James A. Doull, of Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, joined the staff as Visiting Professor of Epidemiology for a 



28 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

period of six months beginning April i, 1941. Dr. Morton Kramer 
shared responsibiUties in the Division of Vital Statistics of the In- 
sular Health Department as well as in the Department of Public 
Health within the School. Others experienced in public health work 
also accepted teaching appointments. 

Courses of instruction for four groups of workers were planned; 
three of these were begun in February and are now under way. The 
ten public health nurses in attendance at the present time were 
selected from the senior, or supervising staff, members of the Insular 
Health Department; the ten sanitarians registered are all graduates 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science in agriculture, and the thir- 
teen laboratory assistants have university degrees obtained chiefly 
from the University of Puerto Rico. To each of these groups a full 
academic course of one year is being offered. In addition, field or 
practical training in the laboratory will be made available. 

The courses offered by members of the Department include bio- 
statistics, epidemiology, hygiene, public health nursing and nursing 
supervision, sanitation, public health engineering, and maternal and 
child hygiene. Members of the Faculty from other departments of 
the School offer courses in bacteriology, parasitology, and the chem- 
istry of food and nutrition. Instruction is also being provided from 
the College of Education of the University of Puerto Rico and the 
Rio Piedras Demonstration Health Unit. A course for medical 
health officers has been developed and will be offered in September, 
1941. 

An "In-Service Training Program" was initiated at the same time. 
During a two-weeks' period Drs. Walter Clarke and E. K. Keyes, of 
the American Social Hygiene Association, offered an intensive 
course in the clinical aspects of various genito-infectious diseases. 
Dr. A. Ashley Weech, of the Babies' Hospital of New York City, 
also assisted with a course of graduate instruction in pediatrics. Each 
of these courses was attended by an average of fifteen physicians 
employed on a full- or part-time basis by the Insular Health Depart- 
ment. 



I 




o 






SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 29 

Time has not permitted carrying to a conclusion any of the in- 
vestigations initiated by members of the Department, though Drs. 
Hardy and Kramer pubUshed a study on the reUabihty of reported 
causes of death in Puerto Rico. Dr. Hardy, at the same time, 
continued his investigations of acute diarrheal diseases and, with 
associates elsewhere, studied an outbreak due to the New Castle 
dysentery bacillus. Dr. Wegman cooperated in pediatric phases of 
enteric disease investigations, while Dr. Doull gave substantial atten- 
tion to field investigations in tuberculosis and leprosy. Mr. Taynow- 
itz, under the direction of Dr. Hardy, concentrated on the statistical 
analysis of enteric disease studies in New Mexico, Georgia, and 
other localities. Dr. James Watt, Research Associate, is also complet- 
ing several reports in enteric disease studies. Major emphasis has, 
on the whole, been given to the research program of the Department. 

Tropical Medicine and Surgery. Dr. Ramon M. Suarez, Head 
University Hospital. Dr. Federico Hernandez Morales, Medical 
Supervisor and Director of Clinics 

Legislative action of May i, 1940, set aside the University Hospital 
as a diagnostic and research unit, cooperating with the district hos- 
pitals of the Insular Health Department in the study and investiga- 
tion of tropical diseases. During the time covered by this report every 
effort has been directed toward a gradual evolution from the Hospi- 
tal's past status to the end defined above so that, in the long run, it 
can serve the public more efficiently than as a general hospital. 

With the splendid cooperation of its permanent medical staff, the 
interest of its attending physicians, and the encouragement of Dr. 
Ramón M. Suarez, head of the Department of Clinical Medicine, 
twenty-two research projects of practical importance have got under 
way. A number of these have already been completed and their find- 
ings released for publication. Emphasis was placed on the study of 
the blood volume of normal persons and those suffering from the 
various types of tropical anemias. Hemodynamics in tropical ane- 
mias, deficiency diseases, the Cephalin test in tropical diseases, and 



30 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

the action of various vermifuges in the treatment of intestinal para- 
sitism were some of the subjects attacked. In connection with the 
latter, balantidiasis and, as in previous years, schistosomiasis and 
filariasis, were also studied. Considerable work was accomplished 
on the action of different liver fractions on sprue, with gastroscopic 
and sigmoidoscopic observations of this disease. The study of a case 
of Mai del Finto demonstrated its etiologic agent to be Treponema 
herrejoni, the first case recognized on the Island. Whenever mate- 
rial was available, yaws, lymphogranuloma, Weil's disease, rat-bite 
fever, and rheumatic fever were studied. The surgical aspects of 
thyroid diseases, peripheral vascular diseases, gall-bladder diseases, 
and elephantiasis were investigated. 

From July i, 1940, to June 30, 1941, the University Hospital ad- 
mitted 688 patients for medical attention. Of these, 105 were given 
admission to the men's ward; 170, to the women's ward; 243, to pri- 
vate rooms; and 123, to semiprivate. Forty small patients were 
treated in the children's ward, recently opened through the gen- 
erosity of the Rotary Club of San Juan. The club donated $2,000 for 
equipping this ward, thus making it possible to conduct certain 
special studies in connection with children's diseases. 

The number of charity patients admitted represents but a very 
small percentage of those attending the out-patient clinics who 
await hospitalization. The special studies attendant on the work in 
sprue markedly prolong the period of hospitalization and conse- 
quently reduce the number of patients that can be admitted. Fur- 
thermore, the precarious health picture presented by these patients 
also explains the necessity for this unusually long hospitalization. 
The need, therefore, for more charity beds cannot be overempha- 
sized. It is true that the opening of two more hospitals, maintained 
by the Insular Government for indigent cases, relieves the Univer- 
sity Hospital of some of its former responsibility, but the problem 
will continue to exist if the out-patient department continues to 
grow. It is a long jump from the 5,000 patients attended in 1934 to 
the 17,000 of 1941. 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 3I 

The out-patient department is still the backbone of the University 
Hospital. A total of 16,998 patients was attended during the year, of 
which 756 were new to the clinics while 16,242 were revisits from old 
cases. Seven thousand five hundred and six intramuscular (mostly 
hver extract), 1,110 intravenous, and 108 subcutaneous injections 
have been administered since July i, 1940; about two hundred gas- 
troscopic and close to 270 rectosigmoidoscopic examinations have 
been performed. Three hundred and thirty-nine metabolism tests 
were completed. As in the past, most of this work is borne by the 
full- and part-time staff. Seven more clinics have been added, 
namely, two dental, two medical, one gynecological, one urological, 
and one psychiatric. We wish to record here our acknowledgment 
of the valuable and disinterested help given this department by those 
attending physicians of the Hospital who have served it so well. 

During the twelve months covered by this report a total of 215 
operations has been performed; loi of these, or almost 50 percent 
were on charity cases. In this same period of time 141 blood transfu- 
sions were given, sixty-five of which were for charity patients. The 
division of surgery always assumes a very active part in the functions 
of the University Hospital. 

Since the reopening of the Hospital in March, 1940, a grand total 
of 1,747 examinations has been completed in the x-ray division. This 
division, functioning with only a part-time radiologist and a full- 
time technician, has accomplished a tremendous amount of work 
which, in addition to the general routine, has included the indexing 
and cataloguing of its films and diagnostic files. 

The clinical pathology laboratory has a total of 18,208 examina- 
tions to its credit. However, a well-equipped, well-staffed clinical 
laboratory is a strong necessity if the University Hospital is to com- 
plete in due time the research program upon which it has embarked. 
A total of seventeen autopsies, giving a percentage of 77.7 percent, 
was considered an extraordinarily high record for the University 
Hospital. 

The eflEciency of the nursing division has been further supple- 



32 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

merited by the employment of nurses' aids, who are adding consider- 
ably to the service among the patients of the Hospital. 

During the summer of 1940 instruction in tropical medicine was 
offered to a group of students from the North, with ward rounds 
both at the University and at the Bayamón district hospitals. Mem- 
bers of the staff also participated in the "In-Service Training Pro- 
gram" of the Department of Public Health, holding clinics on yaws 
and lymphogranuloma. 

Biophysics and Radiation Studies. Dr. Gleason W. Kenrick, Head 

During the period from July i, 1940, to June 30, 1941, measure- 
ments have been continued on ultraviolet solar radiation, using the 
Westinghouse recording equipment in conjunction with the Leeds 
and Northrup counting circuits. These data have been reduced cur- 
rently and graphs have been prepared monthly to show the trends. 
However, operations have been rendered difi&cult by an abnormally 
large labor turnover, which reflects the unstable conditions resulting 
from the rapid development of the demand for efficient personnel 
for defense activities. 

Negotiations have been continued with the National Institute of 
Health and the National Bureau of Standards, and these arrange- 
ments have now reached a stage where both institutions have prom- 
ised to supply gratis more modern ultraviolet recording equipment 
within the next few months. The new set-ups will duplicate others 
to be installed at various points in continental United States, and 
should prove very valuable in providing strictly comparable data for 
intercomparison. Previously, a serious limitation in comparing 
ultraviolet data at distant locations has been the difference in the 
characteristics of the various units used by the investigators at such 
points. 

It is proposed to overlap observations with the present equipment 
and the new apparatus so as to make an extended comparison sim- 
ilar in scope to the brief check carried out previously. This will en- 
able the division to employ the existing series of data in the study of 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 33 

long-period and seasonal variations. It is believed that the new 
equipment v^ill also present less maintenance problems than the 
present apparatus, which is exceptionally sensitive to moisture, thus 
creating certain difi&culties that prove rather serious when the oper- 
ating personnel is frequently changing. If, as anticipated, the new 
recorders arrive early in the coming fiscal year, the observational 
program will be much enlarged, particularly during the intercom- 
parison period. The computing load will also be extended. 

In cooperation with the United States Weather Bureau the divi- 
sion has agreed to take over the measurements of total solar radiation 
at San Juan. This work had been carried on for several years at the 
local weather bureau, but was discontinued when apparatus diffi- 
culties developed which rendered doubtful the precision of the data. 
The division plans to utilize, as soon as received, an Epley unit 
which is being furnished by the weather bureau, and a Leeds and 
Northrup recorder which is available locally, to initiate this series so 
important to bioclimatological studies. Plans have also been dis- 
cussed for the extension of the work in biophysics to include work 
in the subject per se, when funds are available, so as to utilize the 
bioclimatological data which is being collected. 

Work has continued, though it has been somewhat delayed, on 
the preparation of the Fassig-Stone manuscript on "The Climate of 
Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands." 

Santiago Primate Colonies. Michael I. Tomilin, Director 

The colony of Rhesus monkeys {Macaca mulatta), established 
for the past three years on Cayo Santiago, continues in good health. 
During the year the numerous breeding females gave birth to some 
ninety-one infants, of which eighty-five are surviving. 

Routine pathological and parasitological studies were continued 
by members of the School. In addition, Dr. Hildrus A. Poindexter, 
of Howard University Medical School, visited the island several 
times to study the internal fauna of the Rhesus macaque and of the 
gibbon, utilizing all the gibbons and more than a hundred of the 



34 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Rhesus. Drs. Philip E. Smith and Earl T. Engle, of the Department 
of Anatomy of the College of Physicians and Surgeons, conducted 
experiments in the endocrinological field, all of which indicates that 
the colony is being used more and more for experimental purposes. 
The close of the fiscal year 1941 brings to an end the grant-in-aid 
established three years ago by the John and Mary R. Markle Foun- 
dation for the support of the colony. Special grants from Columbia 
University and the School will be set aside for the maintenance of 
the colony and the continuation of its work. 

Routine Services 

During the year under review the various departments of the 
School and Hospital have accounted for the following routine 
work: Bacteriology, 1,181 examinations, with 1,752 agglutination 
tests reported directly to the Insular Department of Agriculture; 
Clinical Pathology, 18,208; Dermatology, 480; Medical Zoology, 
2,588 ; Pathology, forty-four autopsies and 3,468 miscellaneous speci- 
mens; X-ray, 1,747; Clinical Medicine, 756 new patients and 16,242 
old ones. 

Recommendations 

As the School terminates its fifteenth year of work, attention is 
once more called to the quite obvious condition that exists therein, 
and has existed for a number of years, from the resulting stagnation 
brought on through the fact that no promotions have been extended 
to the full-time faculty members of the institution throughout their 
many long years of faithful and conscientious service. This situation 
creates, at the same time, a serious impasse, since it forbids the 
advancement to higher ratings of the younger members of the staii, 
who are consequently growing restless and looking toward other 
fields to conquer. Since the latter see very little future ahead, the 
situation likewise serves as a deterrent to their wish to continue 
further advanced studies as part of their technical training, which is 
something that should be encouraged by every means possible. In 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 35 

explanation of the above, we may add here that the different sources 
of budgetary incomes, required for the maintenance of the activities 
of the School, are partly responsible for the present situation. 

Novi^ that the building program is over, during which interval 
every efiort of the administration was bent toward securing funds 
for the construction and equipping of the new units, the pressing 
problem before it at the moment is the necessity to meet the demands 
brought about by the expanding activities of the institution. From a 
small organization which could be supported on a yearly budget of 
$30,500 in 1926, the School has grown to a peak where it requires an 
approximate annual maintenance appropriation of $276,747. Such 
growth was to be expected and is, of course, desirable in every re- 
spect. However, in spite of apparent successes in obtaining monies 
from different outside sources, we again return to the plea for a per- 
manent operating budget, from which the institution can meet and 
supply its needs, without having to resort to outside help, to depend 
on occasional donations before starting additional research, or to 
employ too much financial wizardry. 

We wish to thank all of those who have encouraged us during the 
year and who, through their support and interest, have contributed 
to the success of our work. Our appreciation is herewith recorded for 
the cooperation found at all times in members of our Special Board 
of Trustees and of our Faculty and staff, both of the School and of 
the Hospital. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George W. Bachman, 

Director 
June ^o, ig4i 



PUBLICATIONS OF THE SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE' 



Published 
Andrews, John S. 



Andrews, John S. 
Brooks, H. J, 



Andrews, John S. 
Maldonado, José F. 



1940-41 

The internal parasites of Puerto Rican cattle with 
special reference to the species found in calves suf- 
fering from "tropical diarrhea." 
J. Paras. (Abs. Supp.), 26:18, 1940. 

A quantitative method for the determination of 
blood in the feces of sheep by means of the Evelyn 
photoelectric colorimeter. 
J. Biol. Chem., 138:341, 1941. 

Animal parasitology investigations. 

An. Rep., P. R. Agrie. Exp. Sta., Rio Piedras, P. R., 

p. 52, 1938-39. 

A preliminary note on the internal parasites of 

Puerto Rican catde with special reference to those 

species found in calves sufíering from "tropical 

diarrhea." 

J. Agrie. U. P. R., 24:212, 1940. 

Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) for American 

laboratories. 

Science, 92:284, 1940. 

A field study in Siam of the behaviour and social re- 
lations of the gibbon (Hylobates lar). 
Comp. Psych. Monographs, 16 (Serial 84), 1940. 

The menstrual cycle and body temperature in two 
gibbons (Hylobates lar). 
Anatomical Rec, 79, Supp. 2, 1941. 

Mai del Pinto en Puerto Rico. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:104, 1941. 

Nutritional studies of foodstuffs used in the Puerto 
Rican dietary. VII. A comparative study of the 
nutritive value of three diets in frequent use in 
Puerto Rico. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:3, 1940.' 

1 The articles in the Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medicine are written in 
the language of the title. 

2 Indicates translation in the alternative language. 



Carpenter, C. R. 



Carrion, A. L. 
Ruiz Nazario, R. 
Hernández Morales, F. 

Cook, D. H. 
axtmayer, j. h. 
Dalmau, Luz 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 

Costa Mandry, O. 



37 



DÍAZ Axiles, A. 
DÍAZ Rivera, R. S. 



Hardy, A. V. 



The incidence of syphilis in Puerto Rico. Survey 
based on die results of complement fixation and 
flocculation tests in unselected and selected groups 
of the general population. 
P. R. }. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:203, 1940-^ 

Sodoku. Report of a case. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 32:293, 1940. 

Placental blood: changes occurring in storage, with 

a review of the Hter ature. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:510, 1941.^ 

Bronchomoniliasis. A critical review. 
Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:107, 1941. 

Hypoprothrombinemia. A review. 
Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:248, 1941. 

The reporting of mortality in Puerto Rico. 
P. R. Health Bull., 5:6, 1941. 



Hernández Morales, F. Apuntes sobre gastroscopia. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:49, 1941. 



Hoffman, W. A, 



Hoffman, W. A, 
Janer, J. L. 

Janer, J. L. 

Kenrick, G. W. 



A case of reinfection. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:198, 1941. 

Eujallia unicostata, a fungus-eating beetle new to 

Puerto Rico. 

J. Econ. Ent., 33:810, 1940. 

The distribution of S. mansoni in the Western 

Hemisphere. 

An. Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Bidógicas, 2:89, 

1941. 

Bufo marinus as a vector of helminth ova in Puerto 

Rico. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:501, 1941.' 

Miracidial twinning in Schistosoma mansoni. 
J. Paras., 27:93, 1941. 

An electronic integrator for counting circuit contacts. 
Electronics, March, 1941. 



2 Indicates translation in the alternative language. 



38 

KoppiscH, E. 

Krakower, C. a. 



Krakower, C. a. 
axtmayer, j. h. 

Krakower, C. A. 

AxTMAYER, J. H. 

Hoffman, W. A. 

Maldonado, Jose F. 
Hoffman, W, A. 

Morales Otero, P. 
González, L. M. 

Morales Otero, P. 
Pomales Lebrón, A. 



Oliver Gonzalez, J. 



Perez, Manuel A. 



Pomales Lebrón, A. 



Pomales Lebrón, A. 
Morales Otero, P. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Studies of Schistosomiasis mansoni. VL Morbid 
anatomy of the disease as found in Puerto Ricans. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:395, 1941.^ 

Some observations of the effects of physical and 

chemical agents in the cercariae of Schistosoma 

mansoni. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:26, 1940.' 

Effect of alpha-tocopherol on lesions of skeletal 
muscles in rats on Vitamin A-deficient diets. 
Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. & Med., 45:583, 1940. 

The fate of schistosomes (Schistosoma mansoni) in 
experimental infections of normal and Vitamin-A 
deficient white rats. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:269, 1940.'' 

Tamerlanea bragai, a parasite of pigeons in Puerto 

Rico. 

J. Paras., 27:91, 1941. 

Effect of azosulf amide (Neoprontosil) and sulfa- 
nilamide on experimental welchii infection in mice. 
Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. & Med., 44:532, 1940. 

Effects of sulfanilamide and sulfamethylthiazol in 
experimental Brucella (var. melitensis) infection 
in mice. 
Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. & Med., 45:512, 1940. 

The in vitro action of immune serum on the larvae 
and adults of Trichinella spiralis. 
J. Inf. Dis., 67:292, 1940. 

Health and socioeconomic studies in Puerto Rico. 

V. A second survey of the Lafayette area. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:547, i94i-' 

A study of hemolytic streptococci as found in the 

tropical island of Puerto Rico. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:66, 1940.' 

Hemolytic streptococci from the throat of normal 

monkeys, 

Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. & Med., 45:509, 1940. 



2 Indicates translation in the alternative language. 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 
Ruiz Cestero, G. 



39 



SüÁREZ, R. M. 

suarez, r. m. 
Benítez Gautier, C. 

In Press 

Andrews, John S. 
Maldonado, José F. 

Asenjo, C. F. 



axtmayer, j. h. 
Cook, D. H, 

Carpenter, C. R. 
Krakower, C. a. 
Schroeder, C. R. 
González, L, M. 

DÍAZ Rivera, R. S. 



Fluorography. A new method of obtaining films of 
the chest at a low cost. 
J. Lancet, 60:168, 1940. 

Fluorography in Puerto Rico. 
P. R. Health Bull., 5:55, 1941. 

Enfermedad de las arterias coronarias. 
Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:173, 1941. 

Métodos de laboratorio en el estudio de las diátesis 

hemorrágicas. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:94, 1941. 

Report of work in animal parasitology. 

An. Rep., P. R. Agrie. Exp. Sta., Rio Piedras, P. R., 

1939-40. 

Some of the constituents of "coqui" {Cyperus ro- 
tundus L.). I. Preliminary examination of the tuber 
and composition of the fatty oil. 
J. Amer. Phar. Assoc. (Scientific Ed.). 

Manual de Bromatologia. 

Notes on results of a test for tuberculosis in Rhesus 

monkeys (Macaca mulatta). 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med.' 

Prothrombin time in tropical sprue. An analysis of 

30 cases. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med." 



Hernández Morales, F, Anachlorhydria in Puerto Rico. 
DÍAZ Rivera, R. S. P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. MedJ 

Hernández Morales, F. Syphilis of the duodenum. 
Amer. J. Dig. Diseases. 



Ruiz Cestero, G. 
Hoffman, W. A. 

Hormaeche, E. 
Peluffo, C. a. 



The eííect of chloroform on some insect bites. 
Science. 

Las salmonelosis infantiles y su diagnóstico. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med." 



2 Indicates translation in the alternative language. 



40 

Morales Otero, P. 
González, L. M. 



Oliver González, J. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 



Rodríguez Molina, R, 

SuÁREZ, R. M. 



Effect of azosulf amide (Neoprontosil) and sulfa- 
nilamide on experimental welchii infection in mice 
(Spanish). 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med.' 

The effect of virulence of Trichinella spiralis from 
passage through rabbits, guinea pigs and rats ( Abs.). 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med.' 

The dual antibody for acquired immunity to Trichi- 
nella spiralis. 
J. Inf. Dis. 

Sprue in Puerto Rico. A clinical study of loo cases. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med.' 

Chapters for Therapeutics of Infancy and Child- 
hood, by Litchfield: {a) "Sprue"; {b) "Kala-azar"; 
(¿•) "Relapsing fever"; {d) "Brucellosis"; and (e) 
"Yellow^ Fever." 



^ Indicates translation in the alternative language. 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO 

SUMMARY FINANCIAL REPORT 

JULY I, 1940, TO JUNE 30, 194I 

Appropriaiions and Resources 

University of Puerto Rico 

University Fund — Trust Fund $72,500.00 

Clinical Medicine Fund 5,000.00 $77,500.00 

University Hospital 

Government of Puerto Rico 

appropriation $79,064.00 

Supplementary appropriation . 17,350.00 $96,414.00 

Pay Patients' Fee — Trust Fund . $32,155.42 
Apartment rentals and main- 
tenance 2,849.52 35,004.94 131,418.94 

Government of Puerto Rico 

Social Security Funds $15,500.00 

Sponsor's Fund — WPA project 13,275.00 

Inter-American Institute for 

Hospital Administrators 4,196.23 

Fund for Study of Oils in Native 

Plants 1,000.00 33>97i-23 

Columbia University 

Budget appropriation $29,600.00 

Land for primate colony 1,500.00 

Extension of animal house 3,300.00 34,400.00 

John and Mary Markle Foundation 

Santiago Island primate colonies 7,050.00 

Other Special Funds 

Carnegie Foundation Fund $3,746.31 

Pathologist's Services Fund 2,356.24 

B. K.A. Fund — interest earned 1,052.00 

Rotary Club grant — children's ward ..... 2,000.00 



42 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 

Anonymous gifts 228.50 

Fund for Maintenance of Rhesus 300.00 

Fund for Studies in Hookworm Disease . . . 40.00 

Johnson Research Foundation 1,000.00 

Carnegie Corporation of New York 4,000.00 

Miscellaneous funds 1,163.41 

Students' registration fees 165.00 

Special Fund for Food 178.26 16,229.72 



Total $300,569.89 

Disbursements and Encumbrances 

University of Puerto Rico 

University Fund — Trust Fund $72,499.87 

Chnical Medicine Fund 5,000.00 $77,499.87 

University Hospital 

Government of Puerto Rico 

appropriation 

Supplementary appropriation 

Pay Patients' Fees — Trust Fund 
Apartment rentals and main- 
tenance 



$78,576.62 
17,350.00 


$95,926.62 


$26,862.07 
2,519.55 


29,381.62 



Government of Puerto Rico 

Social Security Funds $14,887.09 

Sponsor's Fund — WPA project 13,275.00 

Inter-American Institute for 

Hospital Administrators 4,196.03 

Fund for Study of Oils in Native 

Plants 680.08 33,038.20 



Columbia University 

Budget appropriation $29,543.85 

Land for primate colony 

Extension of animal house 3,080.79 32,624.64 



John and Mary Markle Foundation 
Santiago Island primate colonies • • 7,050.00 



SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE 43 

Other Special Funds 

Carnegie Foundation Fund $3,693.85 

Pathologist's Services Fund 2,003.52 

B.K.A. Fund — interest earned 860,00 

Rotary Club grant — children's ward 1,420.42 

Anonymous gifts 226.73 

Fund for Maintenance of Rhesus 300.00 

Fund for Studies in Hookworm Disease ... .60 

Carnegie Corporation of New York ..... 1,411,69 

Miscellaneous funds 1,159.09 11,075,90 



Balance June 30, 1941 i3>973'04 

Total $300,569.89 



Escuela de Medicina Tropical 

bajo los auspicios de la universidad de columbia 
San Juan, Puerto Rico 



Memoria del Director 

Del Curso de 1940 a 1941 



PUBLICADO POR LA 

Universidad de Puerto Rico 

Y LA 

Universidad de Columbia 



MEMORIA DEL DIRECTOR DE LA ESCUELA DE 

MEDICINA TROPICAL, BAJO LOS AUSPICIOS 

DE LA UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA, EN 

EL CURSO ACADÉMICO DE 1940-41 

Señores de la Junta Especial de Síndicos: 

Presentamos en las siguientes páginas un informe preliminar de 
las labores realizadas en los departamentos administrativos y de in- 
vestigación de la Escuela de Medicina Tropical durante los meses 
transcurridos desde el primero de julio de 1940 al primero de julio 
de 1941. Nuestra exposición se concreta exclusivamente a los hechos 
realizados, sin comentarlos apenas, para que las personas interesadas 
puedan formarse la idea más completa posible de los resultados 
obtenidos hasta aquí. 

Durante este período de tiempo se ha terminado la ampliación de 
los edificios que fueron planeados al comenzar la primavera de 1933. 
Según decíamos en las memorias de años anteriores, la edificación 
de las nuevas alas con que contamos ahora pudo únicamente reali- 
zarse merced a las subvenciones recibidas de algunas agencias fede- 
rales e insulares. Merece recordarse que en las dos alas recientemente 
construidas, adonde se hayan instaladas ahora la biblioteca, las ofi- 
cinas del "Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medi- 
cine," las habitaciones de vivienda y un departamento de fisiología, 
más un edificio contiguo para alojamiento de los animales de experi- 
mentación, fueron edificadas con la asistencia de la Puerto Rico 
Reconstruction Administration y del Gobierno de Puerto Rico. 
También la WPA (WorJ{ Projects Administration) ha asignado 
recientemente $28,326 para la ampliación del edificio de animales, 
sumada a la asignación inicial de $13,275 del Gobierno Insular. 

Patrocinado por el American College of Hospital Administrators, 
la American Hospital Association y organismos de este país, se llevó 
a cabo en nuestra institución, desde el día primero al catorce de 



48 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

diciembre de 1940, el primer Instituto Interamericano de Adminis- 
tradores de Hospitales. Durante la celebración de esta asamblea 
tuvieron oportunidad de reunirse los representantes de las organiza- 
ciones hospitalarias nacionales con los de Hispanoamérica para dis- 
cutir problemas de interés mutuo, lo que indudablemente habrá de 
servir para estrechar las relaciones científicas y profesionales entre 
los funcionarios que se dedican a la ciencia hospitalaria en la parte 
norte y sur de este hemisferio. Gracias a los esfuerzos realizados por 
Don Félix Lámela el número de matriculados al Instituto llegó a 
92 personas, entre ellas 34 médicos, todas las cuales estuvieron pre- 
sentes durante las dos semanas que duró la celebración de la asam- 
blea. Hubo además 91 funcionarios pertenecientes a instituciones 
hospitalarias o servicios afines que se matricularon en cursos espe- 
ciales de conferencias y demostraciones, lo que da un total de 183 
asistentes. En todo el grupo estaban representadas todas las fun- 
ciones del servicio hospitalario de estas islas del Mar Caribe y 27 
funcionarios de este servicio hospitalario procedían de fuera de 
Puerto Rico. 

La labor combinada de la Escuela de Medicina Tropical y el De- 
partamento Insular de Sanidad logró, con la aprobación de la Junta 
Especial de Síndicos, del seis de mayo de 1940, inaugurar un De- 
partamento de Salud PúbHca en nuestra institución, ampliando de 
esta manera su programa educativo que comprende ahora distintos 
aspectos del servicio sanitario previamente proyectado y para lo cual 
se asignó la suma de $65,000 de fondos prorrateados por la National 
Social Security Act. Comenzóse la labor pedagógica el diecisiete 
de febrero de 194 1 con unos 33 alumnos, cuidadosamente seleccio- 
nados entre los candidatos más capaces que habían solicitado ser ad- 
mitidos. La labor que desarrollará este departamento durante un 
número de años se ceñirá exclusivamente a impartir enseñanza a los 
funcionarios sanitarios de este país y a preparar hombres y mujeres 
para las labores administrativas y desempeñar distintos cargos en el 
Departamento Insular de Sanidad. 

El Departamento de Salud Pública promete ser una de las uni- 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 49 

dades más valiosas de la Escuela de Medicina Tropical, la cual 
cuenta con la labor de sus departamentos de investigación para 
realizar empresas de gran valía en el campo de la ciencia sanitaria. 
Los proyectos de investigación preparados en la Escuela serán de 
gran utilidad a nuestro país. Sin embargo, para que un vasto pro- 
grama de salud pública pueda realizarse, la labor de cada departa- 
mento no deberá absorber el tiempo y las energías de los otros. Las 
labores pedagógicas y de investigación deberán realizarse a la par. 

El año pasado la Legislatura concedió al cuerpo facultativo del 
Hospital de la Universidad el derecho de preparar su propio regla- 
mento para admisión de enfermos, de tal modo que el Hospital 
quedó convertido en una institución para el estudio de casos espe- 
ciales de medicina tropical. Esta medida ha servido para estimular 
la labor de investigación en el Hospital de la Universidad, la cual ha 
recibido un gran impulso durante el año, a pesar de la falta de per- 
sonal y de la escasez de fondos. Esperamos, por tanto, que en el 
próximo año, con el aumento de las asignaciones para el Hospital, 
su trabajo habrá de ser mucho mayor. 

Durante los nueve meses transcurridos han desfilado por esta 
institución los siguientes visitantes: Dr. Warren F. Draper, As- 
sistant Surgeon General; Dr. E. C. Ernst, Jefe del Pan American 
Sanitary Bureau; Dr. John D. Long y Dr. John R. Murdock, 
pertenecientes todos ellos al Servicio de Salud Pública de los Estados 
Unidos; y Dr. Winfred Overholser de St. Elizabeth's Hospital 
de Washington. A la celebración del Instituto Interamericano de 
Administradores de Hospitales concurrieron el Dr. Malcolm T. 
MacEachern, Director Asociado del American College of Surgeons; 
el Dr. A. C. Bachmeyer, Jefe de las Clínicas del Hospital de la Uni- 
versidad de Chicago; el Sr. James A. Hamilton, Director del Hospi- 
tal de la Universidad de New Haven, Connecticut, y el Sr. Gerhard 
Hartman, Secretario Ejecutivo del American College of Hospital 
Administrators. Han participado en la organización y labores del 
Departamento de Salud Pública los Drs. Walter Clarke y E. K. 
Keyes de la American Social Hygiene Association; Dr. A. Ashley 



50 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

Weech, Profesor Asociado de Pediatría del Hospital de Niños del 
College of Physicians and Surgeons; Dr. James A. DouU de la West- 
ern Reserve University. Los Drs. Harry S. Mustard, Director del 
DeLamar Institute of Public Health; Philip E. Smith y Earl T. 
Engle, del Departamento de Anatomía del College of Physicians 
and Surgeons; H. L. Daiell, Director de la Clínica de Investigación 
de la Johnson Research Foundation de New Brunswick, New Jer- 
sey; George S. Stevenson, Director Médico del National Committee 
for Mental Hygiene; A. L. Briceño Rossi, de Venezuela, y Rulx 
León, de Haiti, nos honraron también con sus visitas a nuestra 
institución. 

Personal Técnico y Facultativo 

Varios miembros de la facultad y personal administrativo han 
dejado de pertenecer a la Institución para dedicarse a otras labores. 
Entre las renuncias que tenemos que lamentar figuran la del Dr. 
Joseph H. Axtmayer, que ha pasado a desempeñar un puesto en la 
Universidad de Puerto Rico; la del Sr. Jorge del Toro, que realizaba 
estudios de radiación solar en nuestra división de biofísica; y los 
Srs. Rafael Castejón y Ernesto González, quienes fueron llamados 
al servicio de las armas. 

Al crearse el Departamento de Salud Pública han venido a formar 
parte de nuestro cuerpo facultativo varios nuevos miembros que 
fueron nombrados por la Universidad de Columbia: Dr. Albert V. 
Hardy, Profesor Asociado de Epidemiología del DeLamar Institute, 
destinado a esta Escuela de Medicina Tropical; Dr. O. Costa Man- 
dry, Profesor Ayudante de Epidemiología; Sr. John M. Henderson, 
Profesor Agregado de Ciencias Sanitarias; Dr. Morton Kramer, 
Profesor Ayudante de Bioestadística; Dr. Myron E. Wegman, Pro- 
fesor Ayudante de Higiene Infantil; Srta. Johanna J. Schwarte, 
Profesor Ayudante de Educación de Enfermeras; Dr. Guillermo 
Arbona, Profesor Agregado de Práctica Sanitaria; Dr. Ernesto 
Quintero, Profesor Agregado de Practica Sanitaria; Srta. Josefina 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 5I 

Acosta, Instructor de Parasitología; Srta. Kathleen Logan, Instruc- 
tor de Enfermeras de Salud Pública; Srta. Winifred M. Méndez, 
Instructor de Enfermeras de Salud Pública; Dra. Elise Schlosser, Ins- 
tructor de Epidemiología; Dr. José Chaves, Conferenciante Es- 
pecial en Práctica Sanitaria y Dr. James Watt, Investigador Asociado 
de Bacteriología. 

Recientemente ha sido nombrada la Dra. Marianne Goettsch, 
procedente del Departamento de Bioquímica del College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, como Profesor Ayudante de Química. 

Haciendo uso de licencias especiales para ampliación de estudios 
estuvieron en instituciones del Continente los Srs. José L. Janer, 
estudiando bioestadística en la Universidad de Johns Hopkins; Luis 
M. González, terminando su licenciatura en bacteriología en la Uni- 
versidad de Pennsylvania; Gilberto Rivera Hernández, en el Col- 
lege of Pharmacy and Science de Philadelphia y la Srta. Leonor M. 
González, quien se encuentra en la Universidad de Chicago estu- 
diando un curso especial sobre archivos de clínica médica. La Sra. 
Constance M. Locke, quien durante muchos años ha venido desem- 
peñando el puesto de editor de la sección inglesa de nuestro "Jour- 
nal," está actualmente en la Imprenta de la Universidad de Columbia 
realizando ciertos estudios en relación con su trabajo. 

Merced a un arreglo entre las autoridades de la National Youth 
Administration y del Students' Vocational Guidance Bureau, tene- 
mos ahora en los laboratorios de la Escuela seis jóvenes que prestan 
servicios de ayudantes. Últimamente tenemos también catorce en- 
fermeras ayudantes que prestan sus servicios en el Hospital de la 
Universidad. 

Hemos de consignar con gran satisfacción que la Escuela ha sido 
honrada durante este año con los nombramientos del Dr. Pablo 
Morales Otero, para Médico Consultante en Enfermedades Epi- 
demiológicas por el Secretario de la Guerra del Gobierno de los 
Estados Unidos, y del Dr. Arturo L. Carrión, nombrado miembro 
de la Mycological Society of América. 



52 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

Este año hemos sufrido la pérdida de la Srta. Cecilia Benítez 
Gautier, cuyo brillante porvenir en bacteriología ha sido truncado 
por su muerte prematura. 

Conferencias y Lecciones Clínicas 

Durante catorce años esta institución ha venido celebrando cursos 
de conferencias y lecciones clínicas que se verifican todos los jueves 
por la noche. Durante todo este tiempo la diversidad de temas tra- 
tados han mantenido siempre viva la curiosidad y el interés de la 
profesión médica de este país y de los médicos que nos visitan. 
Constituyen estos cursos de conferencias parte principalísima del 
programa pedagógico de la institución. Véase a continuación el pro- 
grama desarrollado durante el curso regular académico. 

7 de noviembre de 1940 Conferencia. Estudios experimentales sobre las en- 
fermedades parasitarias nodulares en el ganado. Dr. 
John S. Andrews. 

14 de noviembre de 1940 Demostración clínica. Clínica roentgenológica: Un 
nuevo sistema de medición del corazón. Dr. P. 
Ramos Cabellas. 

28 de noviembre de 1940 Conferencia. Demostraciones de las hormonas go- 
nodotrópicas. Dr. Philip E. Smith, College of Phy- 
sicians and Surgeons. 

5 de diciembre de 1940 Conferencia. Contribución de las instituciones hos- 
pitalarias a la educación profesional. Dr. A. C. 
Bachmeyer, University of Chicago. 

19 de diciembre de 1940 Conferencia. Enzimos antihelmínticos de origen 
vegetal. Dr. Conrado F. Asenjo. 

9 de enero de 1941 Conferencia. Estudio de los estreptococos hemolíti- 

cos tal como se observan en Puerto Rico. Dr. A. 
Pomales Lebrón. 

16 de enero de 1941 Conferencia. Deformidad de los pies por el calzado. 

Major Lester M. Dyke, Medical Corps, United 
States Army. 

23 de enero de 194 1 Conferencia. Algunas enfermedades provocadas por 

insectos. Dr. T. H. D. Griffitts, United States 
Public Health Service. 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 
30 de enero de 194 1 



53 



13 de febrero de 1941 

20 de febrero de 194 1 

27 de febrero de 194 1 
6 de marzo de 194 1 

13 de marzo de 194 1 
20 de marzo de 1941 

27 de marzo de 194 1 

3 de abril de 194 1 

10 de abril de 194 1 
17 de abril de 194 1 

24 de abril de 194 1 
I de mayo de 194 1 



Conferencia. Problema de la tuberculosis pulmonar 
en Puerto Rico en caso de una movilización militar. 
Lieutenant J. R. Vivas, Medical Corps, United 
States Army. 

Conferencia. Anatomopatología de la esquistoso- 
miasis mansónica en Puerto Rico. Dr. Enrique 

KOPPISCH. 

Demostración clínica. 

Cuerpo Facultativo del Hospital Presbi- 
teriano. 

Conferencia. Manera de proceder en la úlcera gás- 
trica hemorrágica. Dr. Basilio DÁvila. 

Conferencia. Accidentes quirúrgicos en las vías 
biliares y presentación de un caso de fístula bron- 
cobilial. Dr. Ralph M. Mugrage. 

Conferencia. Génesis del edema. Dr. A. Ashley 
Weech, College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Demostración clínica. 

Cuerpo Facultativo del Hospital de la Uni- 
versidad. 

Conferencia. Funciones que han de desempeñar los 
hospitales de distrito en relación con las necesidades 
de la comunidad. Dr. R. H. Señeriz, 

Conferencia. Los estados convulsivos en los niños 
y su relación con la hipertermia. Dr. Myron E. 
Wegman. 

Conferencia. Balantidiasis coli: Informe preliminar 
de tres casos en estudio. Dr. A. Díaz Atiles. 

Conferencia. El arte de la medicina tras bastidores. 
Dr. George S. Stevenson, National Committee for 
Mental Hygiene. 

Demostración clínicopatológica. Dr. Enrique Kop- 

PISCH. 

Demostración clínica. Cirugía de la glándula tiroi- 
des en Puerto Rico: Presentación de varios casos. 
Dr. J. Noya Benítez. 



54 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

2 de mayo de 1941 Conferencia. Aspectos interesantes en la historia de 

la tuberculosis. Dr. James A. Doull, Western Re- 
serve University. 

8 de mayo de 194 1 Demostración clínicopatológica. Dr. Enrique Kop- 

PISCH. 

15 de mayo de 1941 Conferencia. Disentería bacilar. Dr. James Watt, 

United States Public Health Service. 

22 de mayo de 1941 Conferencia. La hipertensión en urología. Dr. E. 

García Cabrera. 

29 de mayo de 1941 Demostración clínicopatológica. Dr. Enrique Kop- 

PISCH. 

Queremos consignar nuestro reconocimiento al comité encargado 
de preparar el programa de este curso de conferencias, así como a 
los que en él han tomado parte, por la feliz realización del mismo. 

Biblioteca 

Esta dependencia ha sido trasladada a su nuevo local, habiéndose 
verificado la mudanza sin la menor confusión ni trastornos en los 
servicios. La nueva biblioteca responde ahora a las necesidades de 
espacio urgentemente sentidas en años anteriores; tiene un amplio 
salón de lectura, decorado en el estilo Renacimiento Español en con- 
cordancia con el resto del edificio, provisto de amplias mesas de lec- 
tura donde se pueden acomodar cincuenta lectores, y perfectamente 
aireado y ventilado. Contiguo a la biblioteca hay un amplio y severo 
auditorio para conferencias y actos. En la planta baja se han insta- 
lado las nuevas oficinas para el personal encargado del "Journal," y, 
en un piso superior, las viviendas para los investigadores y profesores 
visitantes que vengan a la Escuela. 

Todas estas nuevas mejoras facilitan grandemente la labor del 
cuerpo facultativo de nuestra institución y son igualmente útiles, 
sin que para ello haya que cubrir grandes formalidades, a la profe- 
sión médica del país en general y al público interesado en el pro- 
greso de la ciencia. La biblioteca está abierta todos los días a horas 
laborables, más tres noches durante la semana y los sábados por la 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 55 

tarde, cumpliendo así las funciones de un centro intelectual donde 
puedan cimentarse las relaciones entre el cuerpo facultativo de la 
Escuela y los lectores que a ella acuden, prestando asimismo servi- 
cios de información a los miembros del cuerpo médico del Ejército 
y de la Armada de los Estados Unidos, actualmente destacados en 
Puerto Rico con motivo de las crecientes actividades de defensa 
nacional. 

Al crearse en nuestra institución el Departamento de Salud Pública 
se han consignado fondos suficientes de procedencia federal (Na- 
tional Social Security Act) para adquirir más libros y revistas perió- 
dicas sobre materias relacionadas con la labor que habrá de realizar 
dicho departamento. Actualmente se han adquirido 342 nuevos 
libros de referencia, existiendo un total de 6,434 volúmenes, de los 
cuales 3,982 son tomos encuadernados de revistas médicas y cien- 
cias afines. Se reciben además 297 publicaciones periódicas : 90 por 
suscripción, 146 por canje y 61 gratis. De estas publicaciones 44 pro- 
ceden de los países hispanoamericanos. Tenemos que lamentar, en 
cambio, que los conflictos actualmente existentes en el mundo hayan 
trastornado en cierta medida el recibo de muchas publicaciones, 
interrumpiéndose el de algunas y habiéndose descontinuado el re- 
cibo de otras por temor a pérdidas. Las cifras que damos anterior- 
mente se refieren, pues, a las publicaciones que se recibían antes de 
que las comunicaciones sufriesen interrupción. 

Gracias a la cortesía de algunos amigos de nuestra institución y a 
las excelentes relaciones que mantiene la biblioteca con la Medical 
Library Association, la Escuela ha recibido 352 volúmenes y unas 
2,903 publicaciones diversas. Con la generosa ayuda prestada por el 
Sr. Thomas P. Fleming, de la Universidad de Columbia, y la coope- 
ración de los Drs. William A. Hoffman, Francisco Hernández 
Morales, Ramón Ruiz Nazario, Pablo Morales Otero, A. T. Cooper 
y Donald H. Cook, del cuerpo facultativo de nuestra institución, se 
le facilita a la biblioteca adquirir constantemente nuevas publica- 
ciones. Últimamente hemos recibido como donativo varias suscrip- 
ciones de revistas médicas, donadas por el Dr. H. L. Daiell, Director 



56 UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA 

de Investigaciones Clínicas de la Johnson Research Foundation de 
New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

Además de examinar y ordenar el material impreso procedente de 
donaciones o de canjes, la biblioteca posee un número de copias 
extras de distintas publicaciones para cambio por otras y la colec- 
ción de separatas ha sido preparada y ordenada para el mismo fin. 
En los anaqueles de la biblioteca están dispuestas para el uso multi- 
tud de publicaciones e informes de universidades extranjeras, así 
como otras clases de material impreso que antes era imposible poner 
a disposición de los lectores por falta de espacio. 

Actualmente recibe instrucción en la sala de lectura una em- 
pleada del Departamento Insular de Sanidad preparándose para 
desempeñar un puesto de bibliotecaria en las oficinas de aquel 
departamento. 

La Revista 

La actual guerra europea ha afectado mucho la distribución de 
nuestro Puerto Rico Journal of Public Health and Tropical Medi- 
cine, habiendo cesado casi todas las suscripciones en aquel Conti- 
nente. Sin embargo, ha aumentado el interés por nuestra pubHcación 
en los países hispanoamericanos, lo cual indudablemente es debido 
al carácter bilingüe de la misma, lo que constituye un lazo vital de 
unión entre las naciones de este hemisferio. El mayor número de 
canjes que tenemos actualmente es, por tanto, con los países de habla 
española. En las páginas de nuestra publicación, así como en otras 
revistas del país y del exterior, han aparecido treinta y siete artículos 
escritos por miembros de la Escuela y actualmente hay quince más 
próximos a publicarse. 

Instituciones en Cooperación con Nuestra Escuela 

Entre los trabajos más importantes emprendidos en nuestra Es- 
cuela en cooperación con otras agencias e instituciones figura el 
estudio del valor nutritivo de las plantas de forraje, llevado a cabo 
en el Departamento de Química y subvencionado en gran parte. 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 57 

durante los últimos cuatro años, con fondos federales (Bankjiead- 
Jones Act) asignados por la Estación Experimental de Agricultura. 
Los valiosos resultados obtenidos en estas investigaciones han apare- 
cido ya en informes anteriores, habiendo contribuido a popularizar 
entre el pueblo los conocimientos sobre la alimentación y cuidado de 
los animales domésticos. La Estación Experimental ha continuado 
igualmente cooperando con nuestra División de Parasitología Ani- 
mal que tiene sus laboratorios instalados en la Escuela, en los cuales 
se han descubierto muchos datos de interés. 

El Departamento Insular de Agricultura y Comercio ha prestado 
su cooperación económica a dos nuevos problemas que están siendo 
investigados en el Departamento de Química: composición química 
y valor nutritivo de algunos aceites obtenidos en frutos del país. 

Prosigue asimismo la labor de investigación sobre radiación solar 
en cooperación con la División de Biofísica de la Universidad de 
Puerto Rico. 

La colaboración establecida entre el Departamento de Sanidad y 
nuestra institución es una de las más prometedoras y de valor peda- 
gógico en todo lo referente a salud pública. 

Al finalizar este año fiscal cesará la subvención que ofreció la John 
and Mary R. Marble Foundation para el sostenimiento de la colonia 
de monos en el Islote de Santiago. 

Actualmente hay en proyecto numerosos planes de investigación, 
próximos a ponerse en práctica, tan pronto como sea posible, con 
fondos que habrá de asignar la Johnson Research Foundation, en 
distintos departamentos de nuestra institución. 

Con las facilidades que poseemos ahora en los edificios reciente- 
mente inaugurados, nuestro cuerpo facultativo está en condiciones 
de emprender nuevos trabajos en cooperación con instituciones lo- 
cales o del exterior. En relación con el programa de defensa nacional, 
están pendientes varios proyectos de investigación en los que habrán 
de tomar parte varios miembros de nuestro cuerpo facultativo, 
quienes han prestado siempre atención preferente a las solicitudes 
que les han sido hechas por las fuerzas militares destacadas actual- 



58 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

mente en este país. Es de advertir que la mayor parte de la labor 
que ahora proyecta el Ejército y la Marina ejecutar en este país 
fué ya iniciada por esta institución durante los últimos quince 
años, planeando sistemáticamente la lucha contra las enfermedades 
tropicales. 

Departamentos de Investigación 

Departamento de Bacteriología. Jefe: Dr. Pablo Morales Otero 

La escasez de personal en este departamento, debida a la ausencia 
de algunos de sus empleados que se encuentran disfrutando de licen- 
cias o que fueron llamados al servicio militar, ha entorpecido en 
cierto modo su labor. No obstante lo cual, los exámenes ordenados 
y requeridos por el Hospital de la Universidad y por las instituciones 
insulares y militares han sobrecargado el trabajo de sus laboratorios 
durante este año, sin que por esto se haya interrumpido la función 
pedagógica ni las investigaciones emprendidas. 

Se ha terminado el estudio de los estreptococos hemolíticos en las 
fauces de monos en estado normal de salud, habiéndose comprobado 
que los caracteres biológicos de estos microorganismos eran de 
origen humano. La proporción de casos con estreptococos hemolíti- 
cos en las fauces de estos animales fué mayor que la que existe en las 
personas normales habitantes en este país; de aquí que es interesante 
hacer notar que los estreptococos betahemolíticos del grupo A no 
aparecieron en las fauces de los monos que llevaban en el país más 
de un año. Estos resultados están de acuerdo con los obtenidos en 
otro estudio anterior de la flora de las fauces de los habitantes de 
Puerto Rico, en que se demostró que la proporción de razas estrepto- 
cóccicas betahemolíticas del grupo A, aisladas en las fauces normales 
de toda clase de personas, era inferior a la de las razas estreptocóc- 
cicas obtenidas en cultivos procedentes de individuos que habitaban 
en países de clima templado. Esto puede explicar la proporción muy 
baja de enfermedades estreptocóccicas que se padecen en este país. 

Prosigúese el trabajo de investigación sobre la brucelosis del 
ganado vacuno. Se han practicado en los laboratorios de este de- 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 59 

partamento todas las pruebas de aglutinación que solicita el Depar- 
tamento de Agricultura Insular, las cuales sumaron 1,076, entre las 
que resultaron iii positivas, 856 negativas y 109 sospechosas. 

Están terminados los estudios emprendidos sobre los efectos de la 
sulfanilamida y el sulf ametiltiazol en el tratamiento de la brucelosis 
experimental en los ratones. Administradas estas drogas por vía 
oral, durante cinco días consecutivos, se logra prolongar durante un 
tiempo considerable la vida de los animales que han sido inoculados 
intraperitonealmente con cultivos de Brucella melitensis, resultando 
de acción más efectiva el sulf ametiltiazol. En las condiciones en que 
se planeó el experimento dichas drogas contienen la infección, pero 
no destruyen el organismo en los tejidos de los animales que los 
albergan. En ciertas ocasiones el número de colonias obtenido en 
los cultivos era escaso, lo que indica que la proliferación de los 
organismos en los tejidos quedaba inhibida parcialmente como 
resultado del tratamiento, y, por tanto, la infección tendía a pasar 
al estado crónico. Así pues, estas drogas pueden ser de utilidad 
para estudiar estos estados patológicos crónicos en animales de 
experimentación. 

Llévase a cabo también en este departamento el estudio del efecto 
de la azosulf amida y sulfanilamida en el tratamiento de la infección 
por Clostridium welchii. Ninguna de las dos drogas modifica la 
fagocitosis. La sulfanilamida, a lo que parece, posee un poder bac- 
teriostático positivo, tanto in vivo como in vitro, contra el Cl. welchii. 
El neoprontosil, en cambio, no muestra ningún poder bacteriostático 
in vitro sobre los cultivos del mismo microorganismo. Las inyec- 
ciones intramusculares de neoprontosil no protejen a los raton- 
cillos contra dosis mínimas letales de Cl. welchii, no obstante lo cual 
en muy pocas ocasiones, cuando se administra la droga por la boca, 
pudo observarse cierto grado de resistencia a la infección. La sulfani- 
lamida proteje, en cambio, a los ratoncillos contra las dosis mínimas 
letales, ya se la use por vía oral o parentéricamente, resultando supe- 
rior al neoprontosil en el tratamiento de la infección experimental 
por Cl. welchii en los ratones. 



6o UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

Ha dado fin el estudio emprendido en este departamento, en 
cooperación con el Dr. C. A. Krakower, del Departamento de Pa- 
tología, sobre el efecto de la administración de alpha-tocopherol 
sobre las lesiones musculares en las ratas sometidas a alimentación 
deficiente de vitamina A, habiéndose demostrado que dichas le- 
siones se deben exclusivamente a la deficiencia en vitamina E. 

Otro de los estudios emprendidos por el Dr. Krakower en este 
departamento trata de demostrar el efecto de distintas dosificaciones 
de viosterol sobre las lesiones musculares de las ratas deficientes en 
vitamina E, cuando a dichas ratas se les suministran dosis adecuadas 
e inadecuadas de vitamina A. Por esta investigación se podrá demos- 
trar qué factor influye sobre la calcificación de dichas lesiones. Des- 
graciadamente, aunque los experimentos no han dado término, ha 
habido una gran mortalidad entre los animales de experimentación, 
lo cual entorpece las conclusiones que podrían derivarse de este 
trabajo. 

En otro trabajo del Dr. Krakower sobre la lepra experimental, se 
han hecho las siguientes observaciones: (i) No hay diferencia 
alguna entre las ratas infectadas sometidas a una alimentación bien 
cargada de colesterol. (2) Los efectos de una emulsión de bacilos de 
la lepra en aceite de hígado de bacalao, sobre el desarrollo del le- 
proma experimental, demuestra que dicha emulsión estimula su 
crecimiento. (3) En los experimentos de transmisión de la lepra de 
los ratones, se comprobó que las marmotas son tan susceptibles a 
esta raza de bacilos como a los de la lepra de las ratas. (4) Some- 
tiendo a las ratas a una alimentación adicionada de sulfanilamida se 
logró detener el progreso de las infecciones leprosas. El chaulmestrol 
apenas afecta el desarrollo de las lesiones, y el azul trípano, según 
parece, estimulaba el crecimiento de las mismas. Se está investigando 
igualmente los efectos del toxoide diftérico sobre la lepra experi- 
mental. 

Los experimentos sobre esquistosomiasis en conejillos de Indias, 
emprendidos por el Dr. Krakower en coloboración con el Dr. W. 
A. Hoííman, Jefe del Departamento de Zoología Médica, están 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 6l 

siendo sometidos a revisión. Se ha emprendido un estudio dirigido 
por el Dr. E. T. Engle, del Departamento de Anatomía del College 
of Physicians and Surgeons de la Universidad de Columbia, sobre 
los efectos del propionato de estradiol sobre las monas {rhesus). 

En los laboratorios del departamento se dieron durante el año dos 
cursos: uno elemental, a un grupo de diez enfermeras graduadas, 
sobre las bacterias patológicas más comunes, mecanismos biológicos 
de resistencia a las infecciones, y procedimientos prácticos para 
prevenirlas en la especie humana, y, otro, a veinticinco estudiantes, 
sobre bacteriología e inmunología, con especial atención a la prác- 
tica de epidemiología sanitaria. 

Durante este curso académico el laboratorio del departamento ha 
ofrecido facilidades de investigación a la Sra. S. D. Griífitts y a 
la Srta. Thelma DeCapito para llevar a cabo sus estudios bacterio- 
lógicos sobre disentería bacilar bajo la dirección del Dr. James Watt, 
Investigador Asociado del departamento. 

La Corporación Carnegie de Nueva York donó al Departamento 
de Bacteriología $4,000 destinados a la compra de equipo necesario 
para continuar los estudios de investigación. 

Departamento de Química, Jefe: Dr. Donald H. Cook 

Continúa en este departamento el estudio emprendido en co- 
operación con la Estación Experimental de Agricultura sobre forra- 
jes para el ganado, habiéndose practicado doce experimentos de 
digestión en cada animal de un lote de seis, utilizando la yerba de 
forraje "Merker," fertilizada y sin fertilizar, después de un intervalo 
de dos meses entre el primero y el segundo corte. Otro experimento 
de digestión se hizo utilizando hibiscus. Está ya terminada la tabu- 
lación de los análisis e índices digestivos de la muestras de yerbas 
utilizadas. Hasta la fecha se han realizado 2,415 análisis de las 
yerbas de forraje "Merker," "Elefante," "Guatemala," "Guinea" y 
"Gramalote." Esta labor ha venido realizándose durante los pasados 
cuatro años, siendo subvencionada con fondos federales {Bankhead- 
]ones Act), y fué finalizada en el mes de junio. 



62 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

Hanse llevado a cabo también análisis químicos de cultivos en 
solución, que han sido requeridos por la Estación Experimental de 
Agricultura, habiéndose practicado pruebas para determinar el con- 
tenido de calcio, magnesio, potasio, fósforo, manganeso, hierro y 
nitrógeno en las plantas que fueron cultivadas en soluciones quí- 
micas. Practicáronse 248 determinaciones químicas en 15 muestras 
de legumbres, 869 crecidas en terrenos diferentes y utilizando 
distintas clases de abonos. Se ha completado el estudio del valor 
nutritivo de las sales de hierro en 30 diversos vegetales alimenticios 
de la isla. 

Continúa la investigación sobre el enrancimiento de la leche de 
coco. Se comprobó que adicionándole extracto de avena molida a 
la leche de coco se retarda su enrancimiento. Investíganse ahora las 
propiedades antioxidantes de la goma de guayaco que, según se 
cree, retarda el enrancimiento. 

Durante el verano de 1940 regresó de la Universidad de Wisconsin 
el Dr. Conrado F. Asenjo, el cual ha estado organizando su labora- 
torio para investigaciones químicofitológicas emprendidas ya, 
habiendo comenzado los siguientes proyectos de investigación. 

1. En cooperación con el Departamento de Agricultura, un estu- 
dio de la composición química de ciertos aceites obtenidos de plantas 
del país, habiendo analizado ya los aceites contenidos en el aguacate 
y en las semillas de toronja. 

2. En cooperación con el Departamento de Agricultura y el 
Departamento de Química de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, está 
estudiando el valor nutritivo de los aceites grasos del aguacate y de 
la semilla de toronja. 

3. En cooperación con la Estación Experimental de Agricultura, 
se está estudiando el contenido de papaína en las diferentes partes 
de la planta de la papaya, durante todo su ciclo vital. Utilizando la 
técnica del Dr. Balls y la titración standard con formol, con una base 
de gelatina, el Dr. Asenjo trató de determinar en qué parte de la 
planta se produce primero el enzimo (papaína). Los resultados 
hasta la fecha parecen indicar que la papaína se produce primero en 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 63 

las hojas, después en el tallo y últimamente en las raíces. Las semillas 
del fruto no contienen cantidades apreciables del enzimo. Las 
plantas utilizadas en este experimento son todavía muy nuevas y no 
han dado fruto. 

4. Preparación de bromelina cruda. En esta investigación el Dr. 
Asenjo está estudiando el enzimo proteolítico de la pina (brome- 
lina) para determinar la cantidad de ésta en el jugo de la fruta. 
Según parece, la cantidad máxima del enzimo se da en la fruta 
verde, decreciendo el contenido de bromelina con la madurez. Una 
compañía frutera (The Puerto Rico Fruit Exchange) suministró 
generosamente al laboratorio todas las pinas verdes que se necesita- 
ron para que el Dr. Asenjo pudiese extraer la bromelina, cuya 
cantidad existente en dicha fruta oscila entre 0.5 y i.o gramos por 
litro. Tanto la bromelina como la papaína tienen muchas aplica- 
ciones medicinales e industriales. 

Se han verificado en este departamento multitud de análisis y 
determinaciones de vitamina C, requeridos por el Hospital Presbi- 
teriano y el Hospital de la Universidad. Los resultados indican que, 
aunque el escorbuto no es una entidad clínica perfectamente defi- 
nida en este país, obsérvanse muchos enfermos en cuya orina apenas 
aparecen trazas de vitamina C. Hase practicado en el laboratorio un 
análisis para determinar la presencia de monoóxido de carbono en 
la hemoglobina, cuyo resultado fué negativo. El Departamento de 
Patología requirió la identificación de un cálculo biliar, cuya compo- 
sición resultó de sales de calcio, con sólo leves trazas de colesterol. 

A más de todo esto, en el Departamento se han verificado múlti- 
ples análisis y determinaciones requeridas por las autoridades de la 
Base Naval y varias agencias del Gobierno y departamentos de la 
Escuela y del Hospital de la Universidad, 

Actualmente reciben instrucción en química de nutrición veinti- 
dós estudiantes matriculados en los cursos de salud pública. 

Este departamento lleva actualmente un estudio de la estabilidad 
de la glicerina que entra en la composición de cierta clase de suposi- 
torios que se usan en los países tropicales. Esta investigación está 



6¿\ UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

subvencionada con $300 donados por la Johnson Research Founda- 
tion de New Brunswick, New Jersey. 

Departamento de Dermatología. Jefe : Dr. Arturo L. Carrion 

Prosiguen los estudios sobre las dermatomicosis en Puerto Rico. 
Durante los últimos nueve años se han ido recopilando observacio- 
nes sobre el ringworm del cuero cabelludo, cuyo número de casos 
asciende ahora a veintiséis. Después de una revisión general de las 
historias clínicas y de un estudio comparativo de los hongos aislados 
en cada uno de estos casos, espérase poder comunicar los resultados 
finales que arrojarán alguna luz sobre las características clínicas y 
micológicas de estas dermatomicosis en Puerto Rico. 

Durante el año se ha continuado la revisión general de las enfer- 
medades provocadas por hongos en este país, prestando especial 
atención a ciertas infecciones pulmonares de oscura etiología, para 
poder determinar (a) el número de estas infecciones provocadas 
por hongos; (b) determinación de las especies micósicas que son de 
importancia etiológica; y (c) diagnóstico diferencial de las micosis 
pulmonares. Este es un punto muy controvertido hoy día entre 
varios especialistas de enfermedades pulmonares, los cuales, en su 
deseo de cooperar en esta investigación, envían a este departamento 
muestras patológicas de los enfermos sospechosos de padecer infec- 
ciones de este tipo, en dos de cuyos casos se ha podido demostrar la 
presencia de hongos posiblemente causantes de la enfermedad. 
Prosigue igualmente la investigación de la cromoblastomicosis, 
habiendo aparecido un nuevo caso cuyo agente causal fué clasificado 
como Fonsecaea Pedrosoi, var. communis. Dos nuevas razas de 
hongos, aisladas en un caso procedente de Venezuela, fueron envia- 
das para clasificación por el Dr. J. A. O'Daly, de Caracas, una de 
ellas el Fonsecaea Pedrosoi, var. communis y la otra una especie 
hormodéndrica típica. 

Se ha iniciado en el Departamento un estudio preliminar de la 
inmunología en las infecciones fungosas, con cutirreacciones y 
pruebas de aglutinación y fijación de complemento. Para este objeto 
se está preparando una serie de antígenos obtenidos de cultivos 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 65 

desarrollados en el mismo medio líquido que se usa para preparar la 
tuberculina, medio éste con el que han obtenido grandes resultados 
algunos investigadores de California al cultivar el Coccidioides 
immitis. El antígeno preparado por estos autores fué bautizado con 
el nombre de "coccidioidina" y parece ser de gran especificidad y 
de utilidad manifiesta en las reacciones de precipitación y fijación de 
complemento. Actualmente se está usando este preparado por vía 
intradérmica, en los enfermos que sufren de otras infecciones fungo- 
sas, tratando de probar la especificidad del antígeno. Hasta la fecha 
sólo se han practicado cutirreacciones a diez y siete enfermos, sin 
que se pueda derivar ninguna conclusión al efecto. 

Hanse practicado veintiocho reacciones de aglutinación en en- 
fermos que sufren de infecciones debidas al Monilia albicans, 
pero las observaciones no son todavía definitivas. En cuanto a las 
reacciones de fijación de complemento, se está tratando de adaptar 
esta técnica de laboratorio al antígeno fungoso, esperando que con 
la aplicación de estas pruebas inmunológicas se podrán diferenciar 
muchas micosis, y podría quizás llegarse a esclarecer las relaciones 
botánicas existentes entre muchas especies de hongos patógenos. 

El número de muestras enviadas al laboratorio para exámenes ha 
aumentado enormemente: 480 en los doce meses transcurridos, de 
las cuales 122 resultaron positivas en el examen directo y 79 en los 
cultivos. En dichas muestras logróse aislar los siguientes hongos: 

1. Monilia albicans: 4 razas en esputos. 

2. Monilia (sin clasificar) : 2 de la lengua; 2 de la vagina; 4 de las heces; 7 de 
las uñas; 4 de los dedos del pié; 20 del esputo. 

3. Hongos levuliformes (sin clasificar) : 2 del esputo; 2 de los dedos de los 
pies; I délas heces. 

4. Trichophyton rubrum: 2 de una lesión onicomicósica; 6 de los dedos de 
los pies; 5 del cuerpo. 

5. Trichophyton mentagrophytes: 7 de las uñas de los pies; 7 de los dedos de 
los pies; I de la planta del pié. 

6. Epidej-mophyton floccosum: 1 de los dedos de los pies. 

7. Aspergillus niger: i del oído. 

Durante este curso académico el Jefe del Departamento tuvo la 
oportunidad de verificar una extensa jira visitando distintos centros 



66 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

médicos de los Estados Unidos, donde pudo ponerse en contacto 
con otros investigadores en el campo de la dermatología, obteniendo 
de todos muy interesantes informaciones y material para la investi- 
gación y enseñanza. 

Desde el día ocho al día once de julio de 1940, se verificó en este 
departamento un curso de cinco conferencias sobre micología 
médica y demostraciones de laboratorio a un grupo de estudiantes 
de medicina procedentes del Continente. El departamento ha 
venido, además, colaborando con las clínicas médicas en las investi- 
gaciones que se realizan en el Hospital de la Universidad sobre 
linfangitis recurrente y broncomoniliasis. 

Departamento de ZoologíaMédica. Jefe: Dr. William A. Hoffman 

Durante el verano y otoño de 1940 el Jefe del Departamento colec- 
cionó en las regiones de las Montañas Rocosas varios ejemplares de 
Culicoides y otras formas afines. Existe una especie, el Culicoides 
hieroglyphic US, descrita primero en Arizona y encontrada después 
en otras regiones vecinas. Las hembras de dicha especie poseen 
idénticos detalles morfológicos, pero los machos presentan carac- 
teres diferentes en sus genitales. Pueden distinguirse, por lo menos, 
tres nuevas variedades en la misma especie. Parece ser que el aisla- 
miento de la especie en estas grandes extensiones montañosas debe 
probablemente influir en esta diferencia de caracteres. Si más tarde 
se demostrase que los Culicoides pudiesen transmitir alguna enfer- 
medad parasitaria en las regiones del oeste de los Estados Unidos, 
el estudio de estas especies habrá de ser de gran importancia. 

Durante el mes de agosto se llevó a cabo un estudio detallado de 
los Culicoides en los laboratorios de las Montañas Rocosas. Además 
del hallazgo de una variedad de Culicoides, grupo hiero glyphicus, se 
encontró una nueva especie perteneciente a otro grupo. 

Durante el tiempo que pasó el Jefe del Departamento en la 
Universidad de Minnesota pudo identificar algunos ejemplares de 
la colección de Culicoides de aquella institución. En la Johns Hop- 
kins School of Hygiene prosiguió igualmente la identificación de 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 67 

los ejemplares de Culicoides coleccionados para el Museo Nacional 
durante los últimos dos años. Últimamente hemos recibido en la 
Escuela colecciones de estos insectos enviadas por instituciones 
estatales de Utah y Michigan. 

En cooperación con la División de Parasitología Animal de la 
Estación Experimental de Agricultura se ha dado cima a los estu- 
dios experimentales sobre la oesophagostomiasis noáuhx del ganado, 
estando ya en preparación los informes sobre el resultado de estas 
investigaciones. 

La colección de parásitos de este departamento tiene 120 ejempla- 
res más, constando ahora de 344 ejemplares en total, sin que se 
hayan añadido en este año nuevas especies a la colección. 

Prosigúese el estudio del cólico de los caballos sin que hasta la 
fecha se haya podido determinar su causa. Se está preparando un 
método para apreciar cuantitativamente la presencia de sangre en 
las heces del ganado. 

Se ha comenzado un trabajo experimental para utilizar la pheno- 
tizaine como antihelmíntico en las enfermedades parasitarias del 
ganado vacuno. Trátase de averiguar el mejor método para adminis- 
trar la droga y estudiar sus efectos en las infecciones que acarrean 
los bacilos existentes en el pasto. 

El Dr. Hildrus A. Poindexter del Howard Uitiversity Medical 
School estuvo en la Escuela durante el pasado verano estudiando la 
Endamoeba histolytica en los monos. El Sr. Rafael Cordova, miem- 
bro del Departamento de Biología de la Universidad de Puerto Rico, 
ha estado practicando en los laboratorios, estudiando parásitos, 
principalmente los trematodes. Uno de los más interesantes des- 
cubrimientos ha sido el de una cercarla de cola bifida (forJ{-tailed) 
familia de los Strigeidae que parasitaba un Australorbis glabratus. 
Este ejemplar no se parece a ninguna de las cercarlas de la misma 
familia conocidas en este país. El Sr. Cordova ha logrado también 
provocar la formación de grandes quistes de trematode en un pez, 
probablemente Poecilia vivipara; el trematode adulto espontánea- 
mente suele infestar el intestino de algunas aves semiacuáticas. La 



68 UNIVERSIDADDECOLUMBIA 

Sra, Ana M. Diaz Collazo ha venido practicando ciertos estudios 
biológicos sobre el Australorbis glabratus, huésped intermediario 
del esquistosoma mansónico, cuyas investigaciones, muy escasas por 
cierto hasta la fecha, prometen grandes resultados. 

Durante el curso académico han estado entre nosotros el Dr. Luis 
Mazzotti, pensionado por el Gobierno Mejicano, investigando el 
trabajo de este Departamento, también la Dra. Elizabeth Gambrell, 
de la Emory University, de Georgia; el Dr. Harry Most, de la New 
Yor]{ University School of Medicine, y el Dr. Saul Jarcho, del De- 
partamento de Patología del College of Physicians and Surgeons de 
la Universidad de Columbia. 

Departamento de AnatomíaPatológica. Jefe: Dr. Enrique Koppisch 

Se ha dedicado durante el curso gran parte del tiempo, además 
de la labor ordinaria, a preparar un número de médicos y personal 
ayudante de laboratorio en técnica general de anatomía patológica 
para que pueda hacerse cargo de estos servicios en los hospitales de 
distrito de la isla. Se ha considerado de vital importancia emprender 
esta labor de enseñanza, pues en el futuro el personal del departa- 
mento quedará relevado de ejecutar gran parte del trabajo ordinario 
con que ahora se ve sobrecargado. Los efectos de esta organización 
pueden notarse ya, pues gran parte de los servicios que antes se 
requerían en este laboratorio por los médicos locales y organiza- 
ciones privadas están siendo ejecutados ahora por los cuerpos faculta- 
tivos de varios hospitales civiles y militares. 

Las autopsias verificadas en el Departamento (44) durante los 
doce meses transcurridos han sido requeridas, en su mayor parte, por 
cuatro hospitales, principalmente por el Hospital de la Universidad 
y el Hospital Presbiteriano. Esta manera de proceder está de acuerdo 
con las reglas primitivas de esta Escuela en las que se decidió prestar 
el servicio de autopsia solamente en casos especiales o cuando se 
requiriese alguna técnica especial. Por otra parte, el número de 
investigaciones anatomopatológicas (casos quirúrgicos, autopsias 
parciales y estudios experimentales) ha aumentado considerable- 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 69 

mente. Comparando las cifras (3,001 del año anterior con las del 
tiempo transcurrido durante este año, 3,468), nótase un aumento 
de cerca de 12.2 por ciento. El aumento en las investigaciones de 
especímenes experimentales es de 21.4 por ciento (desde 429 a 521) 
y en los exámenes de muestras quirúrgicas de 14.5 por ciento (desde 
2,572 a 2,947), incluyendo entre estas últimas 141 autopsias parciales. 
Estas cifras demuestran claramente la excesiva labor que ordinaria- 
mente se ha llevado a cabo en este Departamento, labor que, por 
otra parte, ha sido posible realizarla en su parte técnica con relativa 
facilidad, por haberse podido contar con un número de alumnos 
que está recibiendo instrucciones en el Departamento. Pero por otra 
parte, como el personal facultativo de esta Departamento es el 
mismo que tenía cuando se estableció hace quince años, la labor 
rutinaria y de investigación excede considerablemente su capacidad 
para ejecutarla. 
Las investigaciones realizadas son las siguientes: 

1. Estudio de un caso de pseudotuberculosis pulmonar miliar, 
cuya muerte pudo haber tenido cierta relación con el tratamiento de 
fuadina a que fué sometido. 

2. Estudio de la forma en que se verifica la extrusión ovular 
esquistosómica en los tejidos. 

3. Estudio de la enfermedad de Weil, que comprende los siguien- 
tes puntos : (a) proporción de portadores de la enfermedad entre las 
ratas y los ratoncillos grises; (b) diagnóstico de laboratorio de casos 
sospechosos ; (c) estudio de las razas de microorganismos aislados ; y 
(d) epidemiología. Hasta la fecha, desde el mes de junio de 1940, 
conócense en Puerto Rico tres casos humanos, en dos de los cuales 
pudo aislarse un leptospira patógeno en los conejillos de Indias; en 
el tercero el organismo aislado no resultó patógeno. Aislóse también 
el mismo organismo en dos ratas y en dos ratones grises, pero nin- 
guno resultó patógeno en los cobayos. El número de casos humanos 
y de ratas y de ratones estudiados hasta ahora ha sido my pequeño, y 
no ha permitido deducir conclusions definitivas respecto a la pro- 
porción de portadores de la enfermedad entre los animales, ni sobre 



^0 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

las características predominantes de los microorganismos aislados. 
Tampoco ha sido posible precisar las circunstancias en que la enfer- 
medad se contrae en Puerto Rico. 

4. Estudios sobre el virus herpético: análisis de las variaciones 
espontáneas de los caracteres de la raza H. F. de Flexner, que se 
encontraron en el curso de otros estudios sobre la mielitis herpética 
en el conejo. 

5. Estudio de tres casos sospechosos de tifus, que se utilizaron para 
tratar de determinar el agente causal en animales de laboratorio, sin 
éxito alguno. En dos casos de pénfigo no fué posible aislar ninguno. 
Finalmente se han aislado tres razas productoras del herpes febril 
en casos humanos. 

Con una subvención de la ]ohnson Research Foundation de New 
Brunswick, New Jersey, montante a $700, se podrá comenzar un 
nuevo estudio, con la cooperación de la Dra. Charis Gould del Hos- 
pital Presbiteriano, sobre la posible acción de los estrógenos sintéti- 
cos en la inhibición ovular en la mujer. 

Han estado practicando y recibiendo enseñanza de anatomía 
patológica en este departamento, durante diferentes períodos de 
tiempo, los Srs. Luis Vélez y Jaime Dávila, quienes fueron a des- 
empeñar puestos técnicos en los hospitales de distrito de Fajardo y 
Bayamón, respectivamente. La Sra. Reyes, esposa del Dr. Félix M. 
Reyes, recibió también instrucción en este departamento. El Dr. 
Francisco Mejías Hernández, después de un curso intensivo en este 
departamento, se ha hecho cargo del laboratorio de anatomía pato- 
lógica en el hospital de distrito de Fajardo. El Dr. Biagio Ciño, de 
Santo Domingo, estuvo siguiendo un curso general de seis meses de 
estudios en anatomía patológica. 

Entre las personas que han trabajado en los laboratorios del 
Departamento figuran: el Dr. Manuel de la Pila, quien utilizó 
especímenes de autopsias en un estudio para determinar el peso 
normal del corazón entre los habitantes de Puerto Rico, y las en- 
fermedades cardiovasculares como causa de muerte, y el Dr. Ernst 
Kohlschütter, de Alemania, que continúa su labor de ayudante de 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 7I 

laboratorio, dedicado casi exclusivamente a trabajos de investi- 



racion. 



Departamento de Salud Pública. Jefe : Dr. Albert V. Hardy 

Este departamento se inauguró oficialmente al comienzo del curso 
académico de 1940-41, teniendo como objeto inmediato impartir 
enseñanza de diferentes aspectos de salud pública a un número 
determinado de estudiantes. Los primeros seis meses se dedicaron a 
la organización de la labor, selección de personal, obtener el material 
de enseñanza y montar los laboratorios, antes de comenzar la labor 
pedagógica. Se han habilitado dos laboratorios para bacteriología, 
parasitología o química, aulas para bioestadística y dibujo de planos, 
todas cuyas dependencias servirán para acomodar los alumnos que 
hayan de marticularse. Los gastos que se ocasionaron con estas obras 
fueron sufragados con fondos federales (WPA) e insulares (De- 
partamento del Interior). 

En el mes de noviembre llegó a la Escuela el Sr. J. M. Henderson 
para hacerse cargo de las clases de ingeniería sanitaria; en el mes de 
enero, la Srta. Johanna Schwarte para encargarse del entrenamiento 
de las enfermeras de salud pública; y en el mes de febrero el Dr. 
Myron E. Wegman para la enseñanza de higiene maternal e infantil. 
El Dr. James A. Doull, de Western Reserve University, desempeñó 
un cargo de profesor visitante por un período de seis meses a partir 
del primero de abril de 1941 y también el puesto de profesor de 
epidemiología. Este personal, en unión del Jefe del Departamento, 
estuvo dedicado exclusivamente a labor pedagógica en la Escuela. 
El Dr, Morton Kramer tuvo a su cargo las divisiones de estadísticas 
demográficas del Departamento Insular de Sanidad y del Departa- 
mento de Salud Pública de la Escuela. Se han nombrado además 
otros técnicos sanitarios de la isla con experiencia profesional para 
desempeñar funciones pedagógicas en el recién creado departa- 
mento. 

Actualmente hay ya organizados cuatro grupos de estudiantes, 
entre los que figuran diez enfermeras de salud pública seleccionadas 



^2 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

entre las superintendentes y enfermeras graduadas del Departa- 
mento Insular de Sanidad; diez inspectores sanitarios con el grado 
de bachiller en ciencia, en Agricultura, y trece ayudantes de labora- 
torio, todos ellos con distintos grados universitarios, procedentes 
principalmente de la Universidad de Puerto Rico. Cada uno de estos 
grupos estudiará un curso académico completo de un año de 
duración, y recibirá prácticas sanitarias y de laboratorio en el Hospi- 
tal de la Universidad y en el Departamento Insular de Sanidad. 

Las materias comprendidas en este curso son: bioestadística, 
epidemiología, higiene, enfermería sanitaria, inspección de enfer- 
meras, sanidad general, ingeniería sanitaria e higiene maternal e 
infantil. El personal facultativo de los otros departamentos de la Es- 
cuela se encargará de explicar bacteriología, química de la nutrición 
y parasitología. El Colegio de Educación de la Universidad de 
Puerto Rico y la Unidad Modelo de Salud Pública de Río Piedras se 
encargarán de impartir instrucción en todos los aspectos del pro- 
grama de enseñanza. Hay en proyecto la organización de dos cursos 
de enseñanza para oficiales médicos de salud pública que habrán de 
ser organizados más tarde. 

El Departamento ha iniciado ya un programa de entrenamiento 
práctico. Durante un período de dos semanas los Drs. Walter Clarke 
y M. K. Keyes, pertenecientes a la American Social Hygiene Asso- 
ciation, dieron un cursillo intensivo sobre distintos aspectos clínicos 
de las enfermedades infecciosas genitourinarias. El Dr. A. Ashley 
Weech, del Babies Hospital de la ciudad de Nueva York, profesó 
un curso graduado de pediatría. A dichos cursos asistieron unos 
quince médicos, todos ellos funcionarios del Departamento Insular 
de Sanidad. 

Las investigaciones iniciadas en este departamento no han podido 
aún terminarse a causa del escaso tiempo transcurrido. Los Drs. 
A. V. Hardy y Morton Kramer están prestando su atención a la 
garantía que ofrecen en este país las causas de muerte, tal como 
aparecen consignadas en los partes de defunción. El Dr. Hardy con- 
tinúa también investigando las enfermedades diarreicas agudas y, 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 73 

en colaboración con otros médicos del exterior, está estudiando un 
brote de disentería bacilar causado por el B. New Castle. El Dr. 
James Watt está preparando la terminación de varios informes en 
relación con los trabajos efectuados en el Departamento. 

Medicina Tropical y Cirugía. Jefe : Dr. Ramón M. SuÁrez 
Hospital de la Universidad. Superintendente Médico y Director de 
las Clínicas: Dr. Federico Hernández Morales 

Según disposiciones legislativas del primero de mayo de 1940, 
el Hospital de la Universidad quedó convertido en una institución 
de diagnóstico, que habrá de cooperar con los hospitales de distrito 
del Departamento Insular de Sanidad en el estudio e investigación 
de las enfermedades tropicales. En el tiempo comprendido en este 
informe se ha tratado de evolucionar, modificándolas gradualmente, 
las normas por que se regía antes este hospital, para adaptar su 
funcionamiento a las nuevas disposiciones, de tal manera que sus 
servicios al público de Puerto Rico puedan ser más beneficiosos que 
antes en que la institución tenía el carácter de un hospital gene- 
ral. Con la espléndida cooperación que presta el grupo facultativo 
permanente del Hospital, el interés de los médicos visitantes y el 
estímulo profesional del Dr. Ramón M. Suárez, se han venido reali- 
zando veintidós proyectos de investigación de gran importancia 
práctica, algunos terminados ya y próximos a ser publicados. 

Uno de los estudios a que se le ha prestado más importancia es el 
de la determinación del volumen sanguíneo en individuos normales 
y en los enfermos que sufren de distintas anemias tropicales. Otros 
de los problemas estudiados han sido las enfermedades por deficien- 
cia, dinámica de la sangre, prueba de la cefalina en las enfermedades 
tropicales y acción de varios vermífugos en el tratamiento de los 
parasitismos intestinales. En relación con estos últimos se ha venido 
estudiando la balantidiasis y, al igual que en años anteriores, la 
esquistosomiasis y la filariasis. Hanse obtenido datos de algún valor 
al estudiar las diferentes fracciones químicas de la viscera hepática 
en el esprú, habiéndose realizado numerosas gastroscopias y sigmoi- 



74 UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA 

doscopias en relación con esta enfermedad. En un caso de Mal del 
Pinto se demostró que su agente etiológico era el Treponema herré- 
joni, por primera vez encontrado en este país. A todos los casos de 
frambesia, linfogranuloma, enfermedad de Weil, piroplasmosis y 
fiebre reumática se les ha prestado atención especial. De igual ma- 
nera se han estudiado con gran detenimiento distintos aspectos qui- 
rúrgicos de las enfermedades tiroideas, vasculares periféricas, de la 
vesícula biliar y elefantiasis. 

Desde el primero de Julio de 1940 al 30 de junio de 1941 se ha 
venido prestando atención médica en el Hospital de la Universidad 
a 688 enfermos, de los cuales 105 ingresaron en la sala de hombres, 
170 en la de mujeres, 245 en habitaciones privadas y 123 en semipri- 
vadas. En la sala de niños recientemente inaugurada, merced a la 
generosidad del Club Rotario de San Juan que donó $2,000 para 
comprar el equipo, ingresaron 40 enfermos, lo que hizo posible 
verificar algunas observaciones pediátricas muy importantes. 

El número de enfermos insolventes ingresado en el Hospital 
constituye una proporción muy pequeña de los que acuden a los 
consultorios de pacientes externos y que esperan ser hospitalizados. 
Ciertos estudios especiales como los de esprú hacen que el tiempo 
de hospitalización sea demasiado prolongado y, por consecuencia, 
reduce el número de enfermos que pudieran ser admitidos; eso sin 
contar con que el estado precario de los enfermos en la sala de 
insolventes alarga demasiado el tiempo de hospitalización. De aquí 
la necesidad que tenemos de más camas para el servicio de caridad. 
Desde que se inauguró el Hospital de la Universidad se ha visto que 
el número actual no es suficiente para complacer las demandas de 
ingreso de los enfermos indigentes que solicitan desde las po- 
blaciones de toda la isla. Con la inauguración reciente de dos Hos- 
pitales de Distrito ha disminuido un tanto el número de solicitudes, 
pero el problema continúa existiendo, porque la cantidad de enfer- 
mos que acude a los dispensarios crece continuamente año tras año. 
De 5,000 pacientes que fueron atendidos en los dispensarios en 1934, 
hay actualmente 17,000. 

El servicio a enfermos externos continúa siendo el más importante 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 75 

en el Hospital de la Universidad; se han atendido 16,998: 756 casos 
nuevos y 16,242 casos antiguos. Desde el primero de julio de 1940 se 
han puesto en los dispensarios 7,506 inyecciones intramusculares 
(la mayoría de extracto de hígado), 1,110 intravenosas y 108 sub- 
cutáneas; se han hecho 200 gastroscopias y cerca de 270 exámenes 
rectosigmoidoscópicos; se han practicado 339 pruebas de meta- 
bolismo. Todo este trabajo ha sido efectuado la mayor parte por 
el personal adscripto al Hospital. Se han inaugurado siete servicios 
clínicos más: dos de clínica dental, dos de medicina interna, uno 
de ginecología, uno de urología y uno de psiquiatría. Hemos de 
expresar aquí nuestro reconocimiento a los médicos que tan desin- 
teresadamente han prestado sus valiosos servicios a este departa- 
mento del Hospital. 

Se han practicado 215 operaciones de cirugía, loi de las cuales, 
o sea, cerca del 50 por ciento, en casos insolventes ; 141 transfusiones 
de sangre, 65 de ellas en casos de caridad también. Por el trabajo 
efectuado puede deducirse la considerable atención que presta el 
personal quirúrgico a las funciones del Hospital de la Universidad. 

En la división de rayos X se han verificado 1,747 exámenes. Esta 
división está atendida por un radiólogo que presta su labor a deter- 
minadas horas, y por un técnico que dedica a ello todo el tiempo. 
Como se ve la labor realizada, a más de la clasificación y catalogación 
de diagnósticos en los archivos, ha sido enorme. 

El Laboratorio de Patología Clínica ha efectuado 18,208 exámenes. 
Para poder realizar el programa de investigaciones que hay planeado 
en esta división, haría falta más personal y equipo de laboratorio. 
Necesitaríamos también organizar una División de Química Fisio- 
lógica para poder llegar a conclusiones más definidas en lo que se 
refiere a la patogenia de todas las enfermedades que están siendo 
estudiadas. Se han realizado 17 autopsias de enfermos fallecidos en 
el Hospital, lo que constituye una proporción de 77.7 por ciento con 
respecto a las defunciones. 

Ha mejorado notablemente el servicio de enfermeras por haberse 
aumentado el número de enfermeras ayudantes. 

Durante el verano de 1940 recibió instrucción en medicina tropi- 



y6 UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA 

cal un grupo de estudiantes procedentes del norte, y durante el desa- 
rrollo del mismo se giraron visitas a las salas del Hospital de Distrito 
de Bayamón y al Hospital de la Universidad, donde se verificaron 
las lecciones clínicas. Varios miembros del cuerpo facultativo del 
Hospital participaron en un programa práctico de servicios sani- 
tarios organizado por el Departamento de Sanidad, habiendo con- 
tribuido a la realización de su programa con lecciones clínicas sobre 
frambesia y linfogranuloma. 

División para Estudios de Biofísica y Radiación Solar. Director: 
Dr. Gleason W. Kenrick 

Prosiguen las mediciones de la radiación solar ultravioleta uti- 
lizando para ello un equipo de células fotoeléctricas Westinghouse 
en combinación con el aparato Leeds and Northrup registrador de 
circuitos, habiéndose adquirido gran cantidad de datos y preparado 
las gráficas mensuales correspondientes. Se ha tropezado con alguna 
dificultad en esta labor con motivo de las condiciones anormales en 
que atravesamos por escasez de personal eficiente que está siendo re- 
querido para otras actividades relacionadas con la defensa nacional. 

Hemos continuado tratando con el National Institute of Health 
y el National Bureau of Standards para ver de obtener que ambas 
instituciones nos donen un equipo moderno registrador de luz ultra- 
violeta, lo cual esperamos conseguir dentro de pocos meses, según 
se nos ha prometido. Este nuevo equipo será semejante a otros 
instalados en distintos puntos del Continente Americano y nos 
permitirá recoger ciertos datos muy valiosos que podrán compararse 
exactamente con los de otras instalaciones. Anteriormente la com- 
paración de los datos de radiación ultravioleta obtenidos en regiones 
muy separadas no eran muy exactos por causa de las diferencias que 
entre sí tenían los aparatos destinados a registrarlos, situados muy 
distantes entre sí. Nos proponemos repetir las observaciones con el 
equipo actual y con el nuevo aparato para establecer comparaciones 
con los datos obtenidos anteriormente, lo cual nos permitirá emplear 
las series de datos ya existentes para poder estudiar las variaciones 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 77 

estacionales durante un largo período de tiempo. Esperamos que el 
nuevo equipo no habrá de necesitar tanta vigilancia como el que 
tenemos actualmente, que es muy sensible a la humedad y, por 
consiguiente, nos crea algunas dificultades a causa del cambio fre- 
cuente del personal con que nos hemos confrontado. Si como espe- 
ramos llegan los nuevos aparatos registradores antes de comenzar el 
próximo año fiscal, se podrán comenzar las observaciones en la 
época más conveniente. La computación final de los datos será 
asimismo mucho más amplia. 

En cooperación con el United States Weather Bureau esta división 
ha acordado hacer las mediciones de la radiación total solar de la 
ciudad de San Juan. Estas observaciones venían siendo verificadas 
durante varios años por las oficinas locales del Weather Bureau, pero 
hubo que suspenderlas cuando los aparatos registradores dejaron de 
funcionar con precisión. Nuestra división habrá de utilizar ahora, 
tan pronto como se reciba, un aparato "Epley" que nos presta el 
Weather Bureau y el aparato Leeds and Northrup ya existente, con 
lo que habremos de iniciar una serie de observaciones muy im- 
portantes para el estudio del clima en relación con la biología. 

Prosigúese, aunque lentamente, la preparación del manuscrito de 
Fassig y Stone que habrá de titularse The Climate of Puerto Rico 
and the Virgin Islands, esperando poderlo terminar en el mes de 
junio. 

Estamos discutiendo los planes para, tan pronto como haya fondos 
disponibles, iniciar una investigación fundamental de biofísica utili- 
zando los datos biológicos y climatológicos ya recopilados. 

Durante el curso de 1940—41 se ha preparado un artículo para 
publicación, en que se describe la adaptación de los aparatos registra- 
dores Leeds and Northrup a la medición de la radiación ultravioleta. 

Colonia de Monos en el Islote de Santiago. Encargado: Michael 

I. TOMILIN 

La colonia de monos rhesus {Macaca mulatto), hace tres años 
establecida en Cayo Santiago, prosigue dando buenos resultados. 



y8 UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

Las 128 hembras parieron 91 monillos, de los cuales sobreviven 85. 
Hemos tenido la fortuna de que naciese un mono gibón, que hasta 
la fecha continúa creciendo y en buen estado de salud. (Como se 
sabe los gibones no suelen procrear en cautividad.) 

Se han llevado a cabo en esta colonia algunos estudios por miem- 
bros de nuestro cuerpo facultativo. El Dr. Hildrus A. Poindexter 
de la facultad de medicina de la Universidad de Howard visitó el 
Islote varias veces para estudiar el parasitismo interno de 100 ruónos 
rhesus y de varios gibones. Los Drs. Philip E. Smith y Earl T. 
Engle, pertenecientes al Departamento de Anatomía del College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, efectuaron varios experimentos en re- 
lación con las glándulas de secreción interna. Como se ve, la colonia 
está resultando muy beneficiosa para proveer a nuestros laboratorios 
de animales de experimentación. 

Al cerrarse el año fiscal de 194 1, cesará la donación concedida hace 
tres años por la Fundación John and Mary R. Mar\le para sosteni- 
miento de la colonia. De ahora en adelante la Universidad de Co- 
lumbia y la Escuela de Medicina Tropical tendrán que proveer 
fondos suficientes para sostener y continuar esta labor. 

Servicios Ordinarios Desempeñados en la Escuela 

Durante los doce meses que comprende este informe, los distin- 
tos departamentos de la Escuela y del Hospital han rendido al 
público varias clases de servicios cuya lista detallada es la siguiente: 
Exámenes de bacteriología, 1,161, más 1,752 pruebas de aglutinación 
requeridas directamente por el Departamento Insular de Agricul- 
tura; exámenes de patología clínica, 18,208; de dermatología, 480; 
de zoología médica, 2,588; de anatomía patológica: 44 autopsias y 
3,468 exámenes diversos ; de rayos X, 1,747; de medicina interna : 756 
enfermos nuevos atendidos y 16,242 enfermos antiguos. 

Recomendaciones 

Al cabo de quince años de labor realizada por esta Institución, 
cúmplenos llamar la atención una vez más hacia las condiciones 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 79 

existentes hasta la fecha durante varios años, en que cierta des- 
animación parece existir como resultado de la falta de concesión 
de ascensos a los miembros de nuestro cuerpo facultativo que han 
dedicado todo su tiempo a la institución, realizando un servicio fiel 
y concienzudo. Esta situación crea al mismo tiempo una gran 
dificultad, puesto que impide el progreso en su carrera a los miem- 
bros más jóvenes de la Facultad, los cuales, por consiguiente, no se 
sienten a gusto en su posición y tratan de encontrar otros empleos 
más remuneradores. Como no ven facilidades de progreso en el 
futuro, no sienten estímulo para continuar estudios avanzados en 
sus especialidades técnicas particulares, lo cual debería ser esti- 
mulado por todos los medios posibles. Permítasenos añadir que este 
estado de cosas se debe a que las asignaciones para el presupuesto de 
sostenimiento de la Escuela proceden de fuentes diferentes. 

Actualmente, una vez terminada la ampliación que requerían 
nuestras edificaciones, durante cuya realización hemos dedicado 
todos los esfuerzos de nuestra administración a la consecución de 
fondos para construir y equipar las nuevas dependencias, el problema 
más agudo con que nos confrontamos en este momento es la necesi- 
dad de complacer las demandas que exigen las crecientes actividades 
de la Escuela. Habiendo comenzado nuestra organización con un 
presupuesto anual de $30,500 en el año 1926, dicho presupuesto se 
ha elevado hasta tal punto que requiere, para su sostenimiento, una 
asignación anual de $276,747.60. Este volumen de crecimiento era 
de esperarse y es, por supuesto, conveniente en toda forma. Sin 
embargo, a pesar de los éxitos evidentes al conseguir donaciones de 
dinero procedentes de distintas fuentes del exterior, hemos de insistir 
en nuestra súplica de que se asignen las cantidades necesarias en un 
presupuesto permanente con el cual la institución cumpla sus fun- 
ciones, sin necesidad de tener que recurrir a la ayuda exterior y 
depender de los donativos ocasionales que se nos hacen cada vez 
que se ha necesitado comenzar un nuevo trabajo de investigación. 

Deseamos expresar nuestro agradecimiento a todas las personas 
que nos han estimulado con su apoyo e interés durante nuestra labor 



8o UNIVERSIDADDE COLUMBIA 

y que han contribuido al éxito en nuestra administración. Aprecia- 
mos igualmente la cooperación que hemos encontrado en todo 
momento en los miembros de la Junta Especial de Síndicos y en el 
cuerpo facultativo de la Escuela y el Hospital de la Universidad. 
Respetuosamente sometido a la Junta Especial de Síndicos, 

George W. Bachman 
Director 
R. L., trad. 



PUBLICACIONES DE LA ESCUELA 
DE MEDICINA TROPICAL' 



Impresas 
Andrews, John S. 



Andrews, John S. 
Brooks, H. J. 



Andrews, John S. 
Maldonado, J. F. 



Carpenter, C. R. 



Carrión, a. L. 
Ruiz Nazario, R. 
Hernández Morales, F. 



CURSO DE 1940-41 



The internal parasites of Puerto Rican cattle with 
special reference to the species found in calves 
suffering from "tropical diarrhea." 
J. Paras. (Abs. Supp.), 26:18, 1940. 

A quantitative method for the determination of 
blood in the feces of sheep by means of the Evelyn 
photoelectric colorimeter. 
J. Biol. Chem., 138:341, 1941. 

Animal parasitology investigations. 

An. Rep., P. R. Agrie. Exp. Sta., Rio Piedras, 

P. R., p. 52, 1938-39. 

A preliminary note on the internal parasites of 

Puerto Rican cattle with special reference to those 

species found in calves suffering from "tropical 

diarrhea." 

J. Agrie. U. P. R., 24:212, 1940. 

Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) for Ameri- 
can laboratories. 
Science, 92:284, 1940. 

A field study in Siam of the behaviour and social 
relations of the gibbon (Hylobates lar). 
Comp. Psych. Monographs, 16 (Serial 84), 1940. 

The menstrual cycle and body temperature in 
two gibbons (Hylobates lar). 
Anatomical Rec, 79, Supp. 2, 1941. 

Mai del Pinto en Puerto Rico. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:104, 1941. 



1 Las publicaciones aparecen en el idioma del título excepto las del Puerto Rico Journal of Public 
Health and Tropical Medicine, que van marcadas con * para indicar que el artículo está publicado en 
inglés y español, o con **, lo que significa que el artículo está escrito en inglés acompañado de su 
extracto en español. 



82 



UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA 



*CoOK, D. H. 
axtmayer, j. h. 
Dalmau, Luz 



*CosTA Mandry, o. 



DÍAZ Axiles, A, 
*DÍAZ Rivera, R. S. 



Hardy, A. V. 



Estudios sobre nutrición (Tres clases de alimen- 
tación usadas en Puerto Rico). VIL Comparación 
del valor nutritivo de tres clases de comida de uso 
frecuente en Puerto Rico. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:14, 1940. 

La sífilis en Puerto Rico. Investigación sobre los 
resultados obtenidos en las reacciones de fijación 
de complemento y floculación, practicadas en gru- 
pos de población, seleccionados y sin seleccionar. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:237, 1940. 

Sodoku. Report of a case. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 32:293, 1940. 

Sangre placentaria. Descripción de las altera- 
ciones producidas al conservar la sangre de pla- 
centa (Revisión de la bibliografía médica sobre 
la materia. Comunicación preliminar). 
P.R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:523, 1941. 

Bronchomoniliasis. A critical review. 
Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:107, 194 1. 

Hypoprothrombinemia. A review. 
Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:248, 1941. 

The reporting of mortality in Puerto Rico. 
P. R. Health Bull., 5:6, 1941. 



Hernández Morales, F. Apuntes sobre gastroscopia. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:49, 1941. 



Hoffman, W. A. 



*HoFFMAN, W. A, 

Janer, j. L. 



A case of reinfection. 

Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:198, 1941. 

Eujallia unicostata, a fungus-eating bettle new to 

Puerto Rico. 

J. Econ.Ent., 33:810, 1940. 

The distribution of S. mansoni in the Western 

Hemisphere. 

An. Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, 

2:89, 1941. 

El Bufo marinus vector de huevos de helmintos 

en la isla de Puerto Rico. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:505, 1941. 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 



83 



Janer, J. L. 
Kjenrick, G. W. 

*KoppiscH, E. 
*Krakower, C. a. 



Krakower, C, a. 

AxTlvlAYER, J. H. 

*Krakower, C. a. 
axtmayer, j. h. 
Hoffman, W. A. 



Maldonado, J. F. 
Hoffman, W. A. 

Morales Otero, P. 
González, L. M. 



Morales Otero, P. 
PoMALES Lebrón, A. 



Oliver González, J. 
**PÉREZ, Manuel A. 



Miracidial twinning in Schistosoma mansoni. 
J. Paras., 27:93, 1941. 

An electronic integrator for counting circuit con- 
tacts. 
Electronics, Mar. 194 1. 

Estudios sobre la esquistosomiasis de Manson en 
Puerto Rico. VI. Anatomía patológica observada 
entre la población puertorriqueña. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:456, 1941. 

Observaciones sobre los efectos que producen 
ciertos agentes físicos y químicos sobre las cer- 
carlas de Schistosoma mansoni. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:45, 1940. 

EfEect of alpha-tocopherol on lesions of skeletal 
muscles in rats on Vitamin A-deficient diets. 
Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. & Med., 45:583, 1940. 

El esquistosoma de Manson en la esquistoso- 
miasis experimental con ratas blancas normales 
sometidas a una alimentación deficiente de vita- 
mina A. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:346, 1940. 

Tamerlanea bragai, a parasite of pigeons in 

Puerto Rico. 

J. Paras., 27:91, 1941. 

Efifect of azosulfamide (Neoprontosil) and sul- 
fanilamide on experimental welchii infection in 
mice. 
Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. & Med., 44:532, 1940. 

Efectos de la sulfanilamida y el sulfametiltiazol 
en la brucelosis (var. melitensis) experimental de 
los ratones. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:541, 1941. 

The in vitro action of immune serum on the 
larvae and adults of Trichinella spiralis. 
J. Inf. Dis., 67:292, 1940. 

Estudios sanitarios y económicosociales en Puer- 
to Rico. V. Segunda investigación del territorio 
comprendido por la Central Lafayette. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med., 16:616, 1941. 



84 UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA 

*PoMALES Lebrón, A. 



PoMALEs Lebrón, A. 
Morales Otero, P. 

Ruiz Cestero, G. 



SUÁREZ, R. M. 

SuÁrez, R. M. 
Benítez Gautier, C. 

En Prensa 
Andrews, John S. 
Maldonado, J. F. 

asenjo, c. f. 



Axtmayer, J. H. 
CooK, D. H. 

*Carpenter, C. R. 
Krakower, C. a. 
Schroeder, C. R. 
González, L. M. 

*DÍAZ Rivera, R. S. 



Estudio de los estreptococos hemolíticos encon- 
trados en la isla de Puerto Rico. 

Estreptococos hemolíticos en las fauces de monos. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop, Med., 16:537, 1941. 

Fluorography. A new method of obtaining films 
of the chest at a low cost. 
J. Lancet, 60:168, 1940. 

Fluorography in Puerto Rico. 
P. R. Health Bull., 5 : 55, 1 94 1 . 

Enfermedad de las arterias coronarias. 
Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:173, 1941. 

Métodos de laboratorio en el estudio de las diá- 
tesis hemorrágicas. 
Bol. Asoc. Méd. de P. R., 33:94, 1941- 

Report of work in animal parasitology. 

An. Rep., P. R. Agrie. Exp. Sta., Rio Piedras, 

P. R., 1939-40. 

Some of the constituents of "coqui" (Cyperus 
rotundus L.) L Preliminary examination of the 
tuber and composition of the fatty oil. 
J. Amer. Phar. Assoc. (Scientific Ed.) 

Manual de Bromatologia, 

Notes on results for a test for tuberculosis in 
Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulaíta). 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med. 



Prothrombin time in tropical sprue. An analysis 

of 30 cases. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med. 

*HernÁndez Morales, F. Anaclorhydria in Puerto Rico. 

P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med. 

F. Syphilis of the duodenum. 
Amer. J. Dig. Diseases. 

The effect of chloroform on some insect bites. 
Science. 



Hernández Morales, 
Ruiz Cestero, G. 

Hoffman, W. A. 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 



85 



Las salmonelosis infantiles y su diagnóstico. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med. 

Efectos del azosulf amida (Neoprontosil) y sul- 
fanilamida en la infección experimental de 
welchii de los ratones. 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med. 

The effect of virulence of Trichinella spiralis 
from passage through rabbits, guinea pigs and 
rats (Abs.) 
P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med. 

The dual antibody for acquired immunity to 
Trichinella spiralis. 
J. Inf. Dis. 

*RoDRfGUEZ Molina, R. Sprue in Puerto Rico. A clinical study of 100 



*HoRMAECHE, E. 

Peluffo, C. a. 

Morales Otero, P. 
González, L. M. 



**Oliver González, J. 



SuÁrez, R. M. 



P. R. J. Pub. Health & Trop. Med. 

Chapters for Therapeutics of Infancy and Child- 
hood, by Litchfield: {a) "Sprue"; {b) "Kala- 
azar"; (c) "Relapsing Fever"; {d) "Brucellosis"; 
and {e) "Yellow Fever." 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 

SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO 

RESUMEN DEL INFORME DE HACIENDA 
Desde el i° de julio de 1940 al 30 de junio de 194 1 

Asignaciones en el presupuesto y otras entradas 

Universidad de Puerto Rico: 
Fondo de la Universidad (en fideicomiso) .... $72,500.00 
Fondo de Medicina Clínica . 5,000.00 $ 77,500.00 

Hospital de la Universidad: 

Asignaciones del Gobierno de 
Puerto Rico $79,064.00 

Asignaciones suplementarias 17,350.00 $96,414.00 

Fondo en fideicomiso por concepto de 

enfermos pudientes $32,155.42 

Entradas por concepto de rentas de ha- 
bitaciones y mantenimiento de profe- 
sores , 2,849.52 35,004.94 131,418.94 

Gobierno de Puerto Rico: 

Fondos asignados por Seguridad Social $15,500.00 

Fondos de asignaciones de la WP A ( Wor\ Projects 
Administration) 13,275.00 

Subvención de la Asociación Interamericana de Ad- 
ministradores de Hospitales 4,196.23 

Subvención para el estudio de los aceites en las plan- 
tas en Puerto Rico 1,000.00 33,971.23 

Universidad de Columbia: 

Asignación en presupuesto $29,600.00 

Para la Colonia de Monos 1,500.00 

Para ampliación de los alojamientos para animales 
de laboratorio 3,300.00 34,400.00 

Fundación John and Mary Marble: 

Asignación para la Colonia de Monos 7,050.00 

Fondos especiales: 

Asignación de la Fundación Carnegie $3,746.31 

Entradas por conceptos de servicios rendidos por el 
Laboratorio de Anatomía Patológica 2,356.24 



ESCUELA DE MEDICINA TROPICAL 87 

Intereses devengados por el fondo de beca B.K.A, . 1,052.00 

Donación del Club Rotarlo para una sala de niños . 2,000,00 

Donaciones anónimas 228.50 

Subvención para mantenimiento de los monos . . 300.00 

Asignación para el estudio de la uncinariasis . . . 40.00 
Subvención de la Johnson Research Foundation, 

para investigaciones 1,000.00 

Subvención de la Corporación Carnegie de Nueva 

York 4,000.00 

Entradas por diversos conceptos 1,163.41 

Entradas por concepto de matrícula de estudiantes . 1 65.00 

Fondo especial para alimentación 178.26 16,229.72 

Total $300,569.89 

Gastos y gravámenes 

Universidad de Puerto Rico: 

Fondo de la Universidad (en fideicomiso) .... $72,499.87 

Fondo de Medicina Clínica 5,000.00 | 77,499-87 

Hospital de la Universidad: 

Asignaciones del Gobierno de 

Puerto Rico $78,576.62 

Asignaciones suplementarias 17,350.00 95,926.62 

Fondo en fideicomiso por concepto de 

enfermos pudientes $26,862.07 

Entradas por concepto de rentas de habi- 
taciones y mantenimiento de prof esores 2,519.55 29,381.62 125,308.24 

Gobierno de Puerto Rico: 

Fondos asignados por Seguridad Social $14,887.09 

Fondos de asignaciones de la WPA (Wor\ Projects 
Administration) 13,275.00 

Subvención de la Asociación Interamericana de Ad- 
ministradores de Hospitales 4,196.03 

Subvención para el estudio de los aceites en las 

plantas en Puerto Rico 680.08 33,038.20 

Universidad de Columbia: 

Asignación en presupuesto $29,543.85 

Para la Colonia de Monos 



so UNIVERSIDAD DE COLUMBIA 

Para ampliación de los alojamientos para animales 
de laboratorio 3,080.79 32,624.64 

Fundación ]ohn and Mary Marble: 
Asignación para la Colonia de Monos 7,050.00 

Fondos especiales: 

Asignación de la Fundación Carnegie $ 3,693.85 

Entradas por conceptos de servicios rendidos por el 

Laboratorio de Anatomía Patológica 2,003.52 

Intereses devengados por el fondo de beca B.K.A. . 860.00 

Donación del Club Rotario para una sala de niños . 1,420.42 

Donaciones anónimas 226.73 

Subvención para mantenimiento de los monos . . 300.00 

Asignación para el estudio de la uncinariasis ... .60 
Subvención de la Johnson Research Foundation, 

para investigaciones 

Subvención de la Corporación Carnegie de Nueva 

York 1,411.69 

Entradas por diversos conceptos . , 1,159.09 

Entradas por concepto de matrícula de estudiantes . 

Fondo especial para alimentación 11,075.90 

Balance, Junio 30, 1941 13,973.04 

Total $300,569.89 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 



0050083260